AWS SDK for C++  1.9.125
AWS SDK for C++
Public Types | Public Member Functions | List of all members
Aws::KMS::KMSClient Class Reference

#include <KMSClient.h>

+ Inheritance diagram for Aws::KMS::KMSClient:

Public Types

typedef Aws::Client::AWSJsonClient BASECLASS
 
- Public Types inherited from Aws::Client::AWSJsonClient
typedef AWSClient BASECLASS
 

Public Member Functions

 KMSClient (const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &clientConfiguration=Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration())
 
 KMSClient (const Aws::Auth::AWSCredentials &credentials, const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &clientConfiguration=Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration())
 
 KMSClient (const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Auth::AWSCredentialsProvider > &credentialsProvider, const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &clientConfiguration=Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration())
 
virtual ~KMSClient ()
 
virtual Model::CancelKeyDeletionOutcome CancelKeyDeletion (const Model::CancelKeyDeletionRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::CancelKeyDeletionOutcomeCallable CancelKeyDeletionCallable (const Model::CancelKeyDeletionRequest &request) const
 
virtual void CancelKeyDeletionAsync (const Model::CancelKeyDeletionRequest &request, const CancelKeyDeletionResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreOutcome ConnectCustomKeyStore (const Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable ConnectCustomKeyStoreCallable (const Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ConnectCustomKeyStoreAsync (const Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreRequest &request, const ConnectCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::CreateAliasOutcome CreateAlias (const Model::CreateAliasRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::CreateAliasOutcomeCallable CreateAliasCallable (const Model::CreateAliasRequest &request) const
 
virtual void CreateAliasAsync (const Model::CreateAliasRequest &request, const CreateAliasResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreOutcome CreateCustomKeyStore (const Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable CreateCustomKeyStoreCallable (const Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual void CreateCustomKeyStoreAsync (const Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreRequest &request, const CreateCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::CreateGrantOutcome CreateGrant (const Model::CreateGrantRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::CreateGrantOutcomeCallable CreateGrantCallable (const Model::CreateGrantRequest &request) const
 
virtual void CreateGrantAsync (const Model::CreateGrantRequest &request, const CreateGrantResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::CreateKeyOutcome CreateKey (const Model::CreateKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::CreateKeyOutcomeCallable CreateKeyCallable (const Model::CreateKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void CreateKeyAsync (const Model::CreateKeyRequest &request, const CreateKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DecryptOutcome Decrypt (const Model::DecryptRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DecryptOutcomeCallable DecryptCallable (const Model::DecryptRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DecryptAsync (const Model::DecryptRequest &request, const DecryptResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DeleteAliasOutcome DeleteAlias (const Model::DeleteAliasRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DeleteAliasOutcomeCallable DeleteAliasCallable (const Model::DeleteAliasRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DeleteAliasAsync (const Model::DeleteAliasRequest &request, const DeleteAliasResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreOutcome DeleteCustomKeyStore (const Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable DeleteCustomKeyStoreCallable (const Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DeleteCustomKeyStoreAsync (const Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreRequest &request, const DeleteCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialOutcome DeleteImportedKeyMaterial (const Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialOutcomeCallable DeleteImportedKeyMaterialCallable (const Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DeleteImportedKeyMaterialAsync (const Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialRequest &request, const DeleteImportedKeyMaterialResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresOutcome DescribeCustomKeyStores (const Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresOutcomeCallable DescribeCustomKeyStoresCallable (const Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DescribeCustomKeyStoresAsync (const Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresRequest &request, const DescribeCustomKeyStoresResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DescribeKeyOutcome DescribeKey (const Model::DescribeKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DescribeKeyOutcomeCallable DescribeKeyCallable (const Model::DescribeKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DescribeKeyAsync (const Model::DescribeKeyRequest &request, const DescribeKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DisableKeyOutcome DisableKey (const Model::DisableKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DisableKeyOutcomeCallable DisableKeyCallable (const Model::DisableKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DisableKeyAsync (const Model::DisableKeyRequest &request, const DisableKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DisableKeyRotationOutcome DisableKeyRotation (const Model::DisableKeyRotationRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DisableKeyRotationOutcomeCallable DisableKeyRotationCallable (const Model::DisableKeyRotationRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DisableKeyRotationAsync (const Model::DisableKeyRotationRequest &request, const DisableKeyRotationResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreOutcome DisconnectCustomKeyStore (const Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable DisconnectCustomKeyStoreCallable (const Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual void DisconnectCustomKeyStoreAsync (const Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreRequest &request, const DisconnectCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::EnableKeyOutcome EnableKey (const Model::EnableKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::EnableKeyOutcomeCallable EnableKeyCallable (const Model::EnableKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void EnableKeyAsync (const Model::EnableKeyRequest &request, const EnableKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::EnableKeyRotationOutcome EnableKeyRotation (const Model::EnableKeyRotationRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::EnableKeyRotationOutcomeCallable EnableKeyRotationCallable (const Model::EnableKeyRotationRequest &request) const
 
virtual void EnableKeyRotationAsync (const Model::EnableKeyRotationRequest &request, const EnableKeyRotationResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::EncryptOutcome Encrypt (const Model::EncryptRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::EncryptOutcomeCallable EncryptCallable (const Model::EncryptRequest &request) const
 
virtual void EncryptAsync (const Model::EncryptRequest &request, const EncryptResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyOutcome GenerateDataKey (const Model::GenerateDataKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyOutcomeCallable GenerateDataKeyCallable (const Model::GenerateDataKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GenerateDataKeyAsync (const Model::GenerateDataKeyRequest &request, const GenerateDataKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairOutcome GenerateDataKeyPair (const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairOutcomeCallable GenerateDataKeyPairCallable (const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GenerateDataKeyPairAsync (const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairRequest &request, const GenerateDataKeyPairResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextOutcome GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext (const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextOutcomeCallable GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextCallable (const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextAsync (const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextRequest &request, const GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextOutcome GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext (const Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextOutcomeCallable GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextCallable (const Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextAsync (const Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextRequest &request, const GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateRandomOutcome GenerateRandom (const Model::GenerateRandomRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GenerateRandomOutcomeCallable GenerateRandomCallable (const Model::GenerateRandomRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GenerateRandomAsync (const Model::GenerateRandomRequest &request, const GenerateRandomResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GetKeyPolicyOutcome GetKeyPolicy (const Model::GetKeyPolicyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GetKeyPolicyOutcomeCallable GetKeyPolicyCallable (const Model::GetKeyPolicyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GetKeyPolicyAsync (const Model::GetKeyPolicyRequest &request, const GetKeyPolicyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GetKeyRotationStatusOutcome GetKeyRotationStatus (const Model::GetKeyRotationStatusRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GetKeyRotationStatusOutcomeCallable GetKeyRotationStatusCallable (const Model::GetKeyRotationStatusRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GetKeyRotationStatusAsync (const Model::GetKeyRotationStatusRequest &request, const GetKeyRotationStatusResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GetParametersForImportOutcome GetParametersForImport (const Model::GetParametersForImportRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GetParametersForImportOutcomeCallable GetParametersForImportCallable (const Model::GetParametersForImportRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GetParametersForImportAsync (const Model::GetParametersForImportRequest &request, const GetParametersForImportResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::GetPublicKeyOutcome GetPublicKey (const Model::GetPublicKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::GetPublicKeyOutcomeCallable GetPublicKeyCallable (const Model::GetPublicKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void GetPublicKeyAsync (const Model::GetPublicKeyRequest &request, const GetPublicKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ImportKeyMaterialOutcome ImportKeyMaterial (const Model::ImportKeyMaterialRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ImportKeyMaterialOutcomeCallable ImportKeyMaterialCallable (const Model::ImportKeyMaterialRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ImportKeyMaterialAsync (const Model::ImportKeyMaterialRequest &request, const ImportKeyMaterialResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ListAliasesOutcome ListAliases (const Model::ListAliasesRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ListAliasesOutcomeCallable ListAliasesCallable (const Model::ListAliasesRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ListAliasesAsync (const Model::ListAliasesRequest &request, const ListAliasesResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ListGrantsOutcome ListGrants (const Model::ListGrantsRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ListGrantsOutcomeCallable ListGrantsCallable (const Model::ListGrantsRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ListGrantsAsync (const Model::ListGrantsRequest &request, const ListGrantsResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ListKeyPoliciesOutcome ListKeyPolicies (const Model::ListKeyPoliciesRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ListKeyPoliciesOutcomeCallable ListKeyPoliciesCallable (const Model::ListKeyPoliciesRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ListKeyPoliciesAsync (const Model::ListKeyPoliciesRequest &request, const ListKeyPoliciesResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ListKeysOutcome ListKeys (const Model::ListKeysRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ListKeysOutcomeCallable ListKeysCallable (const Model::ListKeysRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ListKeysAsync (const Model::ListKeysRequest &request, const ListKeysResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ListResourceTagsOutcome ListResourceTags (const Model::ListResourceTagsRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ListResourceTagsOutcomeCallable ListResourceTagsCallable (const Model::ListResourceTagsRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ListResourceTagsAsync (const Model::ListResourceTagsRequest &request, const ListResourceTagsResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ListRetirableGrantsOutcome ListRetirableGrants (const Model::ListRetirableGrantsRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ListRetirableGrantsOutcomeCallable ListRetirableGrantsCallable (const Model::ListRetirableGrantsRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ListRetirableGrantsAsync (const Model::ListRetirableGrantsRequest &request, const ListRetirableGrantsResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::PutKeyPolicyOutcome PutKeyPolicy (const Model::PutKeyPolicyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::PutKeyPolicyOutcomeCallable PutKeyPolicyCallable (const Model::PutKeyPolicyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void PutKeyPolicyAsync (const Model::PutKeyPolicyRequest &request, const PutKeyPolicyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ReEncryptOutcome ReEncrypt (const Model::ReEncryptRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ReEncryptOutcomeCallable ReEncryptCallable (const Model::ReEncryptRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ReEncryptAsync (const Model::ReEncryptRequest &request, const ReEncryptResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ReplicateKeyOutcome ReplicateKey (const Model::ReplicateKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ReplicateKeyOutcomeCallable ReplicateKeyCallable (const Model::ReplicateKeyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ReplicateKeyAsync (const Model::ReplicateKeyRequest &request, const ReplicateKeyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::RetireGrantOutcome RetireGrant (const Model::RetireGrantRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::RetireGrantOutcomeCallable RetireGrantCallable (const Model::RetireGrantRequest &request) const
 
virtual void RetireGrantAsync (const Model::RetireGrantRequest &request, const RetireGrantResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::RevokeGrantOutcome RevokeGrant (const Model::RevokeGrantRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::RevokeGrantOutcomeCallable RevokeGrantCallable (const Model::RevokeGrantRequest &request) const
 
virtual void RevokeGrantAsync (const Model::RevokeGrantRequest &request, const RevokeGrantResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionOutcome ScheduleKeyDeletion (const Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionOutcomeCallable ScheduleKeyDeletionCallable (const Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionRequest &request) const
 
virtual void ScheduleKeyDeletionAsync (const Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionRequest &request, const ScheduleKeyDeletionResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::SignOutcome Sign (const Model::SignRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::SignOutcomeCallable SignCallable (const Model::SignRequest &request) const
 
virtual void SignAsync (const Model::SignRequest &request, const SignResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::TagResourceOutcome TagResource (const Model::TagResourceRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::TagResourceOutcomeCallable TagResourceCallable (const Model::TagResourceRequest &request) const
 
virtual void TagResourceAsync (const Model::TagResourceRequest &request, const TagResourceResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::UntagResourceOutcome UntagResource (const Model::UntagResourceRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::UntagResourceOutcomeCallable UntagResourceCallable (const Model::UntagResourceRequest &request) const
 
virtual void UntagResourceAsync (const Model::UntagResourceRequest &request, const UntagResourceResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::UpdateAliasOutcome UpdateAlias (const Model::UpdateAliasRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::UpdateAliasOutcomeCallable UpdateAliasCallable (const Model::UpdateAliasRequest &request) const
 
virtual void UpdateAliasAsync (const Model::UpdateAliasRequest &request, const UpdateAliasResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreOutcome UpdateCustomKeyStore (const Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable UpdateCustomKeyStoreCallable (const Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreRequest &request) const
 
virtual void UpdateCustomKeyStoreAsync (const Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreRequest &request, const UpdateCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionOutcome UpdateKeyDescription (const Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionOutcomeCallable UpdateKeyDescriptionCallable (const Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionRequest &request) const
 
virtual void UpdateKeyDescriptionAsync (const Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionRequest &request, const UpdateKeyDescriptionResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionOutcome UpdatePrimaryRegion (const Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionOutcomeCallable UpdatePrimaryRegionCallable (const Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionRequest &request) const
 
virtual void UpdatePrimaryRegionAsync (const Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionRequest &request, const UpdatePrimaryRegionResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
virtual Model::VerifyOutcome Verify (const Model::VerifyRequest &request) const
 
virtual Model::VerifyOutcomeCallable VerifyCallable (const Model::VerifyRequest &request) const
 
virtual void VerifyAsync (const Model::VerifyRequest &request, const VerifyResponseReceivedHandler &handler, const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &context=nullptr) const
 
void OverrideEndpoint (const Aws::String &endpoint)
 
- Public Member Functions inherited from Aws::Client::AWSJsonClient
 AWSJsonClient (const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &configuration, const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Client::AWSAuthSigner > &signer, const std::shared_ptr< AWSErrorMarshaller > &errorMarshaller)
 
 AWSJsonClient (const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &configuration, const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Auth::AWSAuthSignerProvider > &signerProvider, const std::shared_ptr< AWSErrorMarshaller > &errorMarshaller)
 
virtual ~AWSJsonClient ()=default
 
- Public Member Functions inherited from Aws::Client::AWSClient
 AWSClient (const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &configuration, const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Client::AWSAuthSigner > &signer, const std::shared_ptr< AWSErrorMarshaller > &errorMarshaller)
 
 AWSClient (const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration &configuration, const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Auth::AWSAuthSignerProvider > &signerProvider, const std::shared_ptr< AWSErrorMarshaller > &errorMarshaller)
 
virtual ~AWSClient ()
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, long long expirationInSeconds=0)
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const Aws::Http::HeaderValueCollection &customizedHeaders, long long expirationInSeconds=0)
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const Aws::Http::HeaderValueCollection &customizedHeaders, long long expirationInSeconds=0)
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const char *serviceName, long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const char *serviceName, const Aws::Http::HeaderValueCollection &customizedHeaders, long long expirationInSeconds=0)
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const char *serviceName, const char *signerName, long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const char *serviceName, const char *signerName, const Aws::Http::HeaderValueCollection &customizedHeaders, long long expirationInSeconds=0)
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection &extraParams=Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection(), long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const char *serviceName, const char *signerName, const Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection &extraParams=Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection(), long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const char *serviceName, const Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection &extraParams=Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection(), long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
Aws::String GeneratePresignedUrl (const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Aws::Http::URI &uri, Aws::Http::HttpMethod method, const char *region, const Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection &extraParams=Aws::Http::QueryStringParameterCollection(), long long expirationInSeconds=0) const
 
void DisableRequestProcessing ()
 
void EnableRequestProcessing ()
 
virtual const char * GetServiceClientName () const
 
virtual void SetServiceClientName (const Aws::String &name)
 

Additional Inherited Members

- Protected Member Functions inherited from Aws::Client::AWSJsonClient
virtual AWSError< CoreErrorsBuildAWSError (const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Http::HttpResponse > &response) const override
 
JsonOutcome MakeRequest (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Http::HttpMethod method=Http::HttpMethod::HTTP_POST, const char *signerName=Aws::Auth::SIGV4_SIGNER, const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
JsonOutcome MakeRequest (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, Http::HttpMethod method=Http::HttpMethod::HTTP_POST, const char *signerName=Aws::Auth::SIGV4_SIGNER, const char *requestName="", const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
JsonOutcome MakeEventStreamRequest (std::shared_ptr< Aws::Http::HttpRequest > &request) const
 
- Protected Member Functions inherited from Aws::Client::AWSClient
HttpResponseOutcome AttemptExhaustively (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Http::HttpMethod httpMethod, const char *signerName, const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
HttpResponseOutcome AttemptExhaustively (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, Http::HttpMethod httpMethod, const char *signerName, const char *requestName="", const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
HttpResponseOutcome AttemptOneRequest (const std::shared_ptr< Http::HttpRequest > &httpRequest, const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, const char *signerName, const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
HttpResponseOutcome AttemptOneRequest (const std::shared_ptr< Http::HttpRequest > &httpRequest, const char *signerName, const char *requestName="", const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
StreamOutcome MakeRequestWithUnparsedResponse (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Http::HttpMethod method=Http::HttpMethod::HTTP_POST, const char *signerName=Aws::Auth::SIGV4_SIGNER, const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
StreamOutcome MakeRequestWithUnparsedResponse (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, Http::HttpMethod method=Http::HttpMethod::HTTP_POST, const char *signerName=Aws::Auth::SIGV4_SIGNER, const char *requestName="", const char *signerRegionOverride=nullptr, const char *signerServiceNameOverride=nullptr) const
 
virtual void BuildHttpRequest (const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Http::HttpRequest > &httpRequest) const
 
const std::shared_ptr< AWSErrorMarshaller > & GetErrorMarshaller () const
 
Aws::Client::AWSAuthSignerGetSignerByName (const char *name) const
 
std::shared_ptr< Aws::Http::HttpRequestBuildAndSignHttpRequest (const Aws::Http::URI &uri, const Aws::AmazonWebServiceRequest &request, Http::HttpMethod method, const char *signerName) const
 
std::shared_ptr< Aws::Http::HttpResponseMakeHttpRequest (std::shared_ptr< Aws::Http::HttpRequest > &request) const
 
- Protected Attributes inherited from Aws::Client::AWSClient
Aws::String m_region
 

Detailed Description

<fullname>Key Management Service</fullname>

Key Management Service (KMS) is an encryption and key management web service. This guide describes the KMS operations that you can call programmatically. For general information about KMS, see the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term.

Amazon Web Services provides SDKs that consist of libraries and sample code for various programming languages and platforms (Java, Ruby, .Net, macOS, Android, etc.). The SDKs provide a convenient way to create programmatic access to KMS and other Amazon Web Services services. For example, the SDKs take care of tasks such as signing requests (see below), managing errors, and retrying requests automatically. For more information about the Amazon Web Services SDKs, including how to download and install them, see Tools for Amazon Web Services.

We recommend that you use the Amazon Web Services SDKs to make programmatic API calls to KMS.

Clients must support TLS (Transport Layer Security) 1.0. We recommend TLS 1.2. Clients must also support cipher suites with Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) such as Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (DHE) or Elliptic Curve Ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (ECDHE). Most modern systems such as Java 7 and later support these modes.

Signing Requests

Requests must be signed by using an access key ID and a secret access key. We strongly recommend that you do not use your Amazon Web Services account (root) access key ID and secret key for everyday work with KMS. Instead, use the access key ID and secret access key for an IAM user. You can also use the Amazon Web Services Security Token Service to generate temporary security credentials that you can use to sign requests.

All KMS operations require Signature Version 4.

Logging API Requests

KMS supports CloudTrail, a service that logs Amazon Web Services API calls and related events for your Amazon Web Services account and delivers them to an Amazon S3 bucket that you specify. By using the information collected by CloudTrail, you can determine what requests were made to KMS, who made the request, when it was made, and so on. To learn more about CloudTrail, including how to turn it on and find your log files, see the CloudTrail User Guide.

Additional Resources

For more information about credentials and request signing, see the following:

Commonly Used API Operations

Of the API operations discussed in this guide, the following will prove the most useful for most applications. You will likely perform operations other than these, such as creating keys and assigning policies, by using the console.

Definition at line 344 of file KMSClient.h.

Member Typedef Documentation

◆ BASECLASS

Definition at line 347 of file KMSClient.h.

Constructor & Destructor Documentation

◆ KMSClient() [1/3]

Aws::KMS::KMSClient::KMSClient ( const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration clientConfiguration = Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration())

Initializes client to use DefaultCredentialProviderChain, with default http client factory, and optional client config. If client config is not specified, it will be initialized to default values.

◆ KMSClient() [2/3]

Aws::KMS::KMSClient::KMSClient ( const Aws::Auth::AWSCredentials credentials,
const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration clientConfiguration = Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration() 
)

Initializes client to use SimpleAWSCredentialsProvider, with default http client factory, and optional client config. If client config is not specified, it will be initialized to default values.

◆ KMSClient() [3/3]

Aws::KMS::KMSClient::KMSClient ( const std::shared_ptr< Aws::Auth::AWSCredentialsProvider > &  credentialsProvider,
const Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration clientConfiguration = Aws::Client::ClientConfiguration() 
)

Initializes client to use specified credentials provider with specified client config. If http client factory is not supplied, the default http client factory will be used

◆ ~KMSClient()

virtual Aws::KMS::KMSClient::~KMSClient ( )
virtual

Member Function Documentation

◆ CancelKeyDeletion()

virtual Model::CancelKeyDeletionOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CancelKeyDeletion ( const Model::CancelKeyDeletionRequest request) const
virtual

Cancels the deletion of a KMS key. When this operation succeeds, the key state of the KMS key is Disabled. To enable the KMS key, use EnableKey.

For more information about scheduling and canceling deletion of a KMS key, see Deleting KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CancelKeyDeletion (key policy)

Related operations: ScheduleKeyDeletion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ CancelKeyDeletionAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CancelKeyDeletionAsync ( const Model::CancelKeyDeletionRequest request,
const CancelKeyDeletionResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Cancels the deletion of a KMS key. When this operation succeeds, the key state of the KMS key is Disabled. To enable the KMS key, use EnableKey.

For more information about scheduling and canceling deletion of a KMS key, see Deleting KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CancelKeyDeletion (key policy)

Related operations: ScheduleKeyDeletion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ CancelKeyDeletionCallable()

virtual Model::CancelKeyDeletionOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CancelKeyDeletionCallable ( const Model::CancelKeyDeletionRequest request) const
virtual

Cancels the deletion of a KMS key. When this operation succeeds, the key state of the KMS key is Disabled. To enable the KMS key, use EnableKey.

For more information about scheduling and canceling deletion of a KMS key, see Deleting KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CancelKeyDeletion (key policy)

Related operations: ScheduleKeyDeletion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ConnectCustomKeyStore()

virtual Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ConnectCustomKeyStore ( const Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Connects or reconnects a custom key store to its associated CloudHSM cluster.

The custom key store must be connected before you can create KMS keys in the key store or use the KMS keys it contains. You can disconnect and reconnect a custom key store at any time.

To connect a custom key store, its associated CloudHSM cluster must have at least one active HSM. To get the number of active HSMs in a cluster, use the DescribeClusters operation. To add HSMs to the cluster, use the CreateHsm operation. Also, the kmsuser crypto user (CU) must not be logged into the cluster. This prevents KMS from using this account to log in.

The connection process can take an extended amount of time to complete; up to 20 minutes. This operation starts the connection process, but it does not wait for it to complete. When it succeeds, this operation quickly returns an HTTP 200 response and a JSON object with no properties. However, this response does not indicate that the custom key store is connected. To get the connection state of the custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation.

During the connection process, KMS finds the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store, creates the connection infrastructure, connects to the cluster, logs into the CloudHSM client as the kmsuser CU, and rotates its password.

The ConnectCustomKeyStore operation might fail for various reasons. To find the reason, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation and see the ConnectionErrorCode in the response. For help interpreting the ConnectionErrorCode, see CustomKeyStoresListEntry.

To fix the failure, use the DisconnectCustomKeyStore operation to disconnect the custom key store, correct the error, use the UpdateCustomKeyStore operation if necessary, and then use ConnectCustomKeyStore again.

If you are having trouble connecting or disconnecting a custom key store, see Troubleshooting a Custom Key Store in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ConnectCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ConnectCustomKeyStoreAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ConnectCustomKeyStoreAsync ( const Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreRequest request,
const ConnectCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Connects or reconnects a custom key store to its associated CloudHSM cluster.

The custom key store must be connected before you can create KMS keys in the key store or use the KMS keys it contains. You can disconnect and reconnect a custom key store at any time.

To connect a custom key store, its associated CloudHSM cluster must have at least one active HSM. To get the number of active HSMs in a cluster, use the DescribeClusters operation. To add HSMs to the cluster, use the CreateHsm operation. Also, the kmsuser crypto user (CU) must not be logged into the cluster. This prevents KMS from using this account to log in.

The connection process can take an extended amount of time to complete; up to 20 minutes. This operation starts the connection process, but it does not wait for it to complete. When it succeeds, this operation quickly returns an HTTP 200 response and a JSON object with no properties. However, this response does not indicate that the custom key store is connected. To get the connection state of the custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation.

During the connection process, KMS finds the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store, creates the connection infrastructure, connects to the cluster, logs into the CloudHSM client as the kmsuser CU, and rotates its password.

The ConnectCustomKeyStore operation might fail for various reasons. To find the reason, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation and see the ConnectionErrorCode in the response. For help interpreting the ConnectionErrorCode, see CustomKeyStoresListEntry.

To fix the failure, use the DisconnectCustomKeyStore operation to disconnect the custom key store, correct the error, use the UpdateCustomKeyStore operation if necessary, and then use ConnectCustomKeyStore again.

If you are having trouble connecting or disconnecting a custom key store, see Troubleshooting a Custom Key Store in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ConnectCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ConnectCustomKeyStoreCallable()

virtual Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ConnectCustomKeyStoreCallable ( const Model::ConnectCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Connects or reconnects a custom key store to its associated CloudHSM cluster.

The custom key store must be connected before you can create KMS keys in the key store or use the KMS keys it contains. You can disconnect and reconnect a custom key store at any time.

To connect a custom key store, its associated CloudHSM cluster must have at least one active HSM. To get the number of active HSMs in a cluster, use the DescribeClusters operation. To add HSMs to the cluster, use the CreateHsm operation. Also, the kmsuser crypto user (CU) must not be logged into the cluster. This prevents KMS from using this account to log in.

The connection process can take an extended amount of time to complete; up to 20 minutes. This operation starts the connection process, but it does not wait for it to complete. When it succeeds, this operation quickly returns an HTTP 200 response and a JSON object with no properties. However, this response does not indicate that the custom key store is connected. To get the connection state of the custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation.

During the connection process, KMS finds the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store, creates the connection infrastructure, connects to the cluster, logs into the CloudHSM client as the kmsuser CU, and rotates its password.

The ConnectCustomKeyStore operation might fail for various reasons. To find the reason, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation and see the ConnectionErrorCode in the response. For help interpreting the ConnectionErrorCode, see CustomKeyStoresListEntry.

To fix the failure, use the DisconnectCustomKeyStore operation to disconnect the custom key store, correct the error, use the UpdateCustomKeyStore operation if necessary, and then use ConnectCustomKeyStore again.

If you are having trouble connecting or disconnecting a custom key store, see Troubleshooting a Custom Key Store in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ConnectCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ CreateAlias()

virtual Model::CreateAliasOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateAlias ( const Model::CreateAliasRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a friendly name for a KMS key.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You can use an alias to identify a KMS key in the KMS console, in the DescribeKey operation and in cryptographic operations, such as Encrypt and GenerateDataKey. You can also change the KMS key that's associated with the alias (UpdateAlias) or delete the alias (DeleteAlias) at any time. These operations don't affect the underlying KMS key.

You can associate the alias with any customer managed key in the same Amazon Web Services Region. Each alias is associated with only one KMS key at a time, but a KMS key can have multiple aliases. A valid KMS key is required. You can't create an alias without a KMS key.

The alias must be unique in the account and Region, but you can have aliases with the same name in different Regions. For detailed information about aliases, see Using aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation does not return a response. To get the alias that you created, use the ListAliases operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on an alias in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • DeleteAlias

  • ListAliases

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ CreateAliasAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateAliasAsync ( const Model::CreateAliasRequest request,
const CreateAliasResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Creates a friendly name for a KMS key.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You can use an alias to identify a KMS key in the KMS console, in the DescribeKey operation and in cryptographic operations, such as Encrypt and GenerateDataKey. You can also change the KMS key that's associated with the alias (UpdateAlias) or delete the alias (DeleteAlias) at any time. These operations don't affect the underlying KMS key.

You can associate the alias with any customer managed key in the same Amazon Web Services Region. Each alias is associated with only one KMS key at a time, but a KMS key can have multiple aliases. A valid KMS key is required. You can't create an alias without a KMS key.

The alias must be unique in the account and Region, but you can have aliases with the same name in different Regions. For detailed information about aliases, see Using aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation does not return a response. To get the alias that you created, use the ListAliases operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on an alias in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • DeleteAlias

  • ListAliases

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ CreateAliasCallable()

virtual Model::CreateAliasOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateAliasCallable ( const Model::CreateAliasRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a friendly name for a KMS key.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You can use an alias to identify a KMS key in the KMS console, in the DescribeKey operation and in cryptographic operations, such as Encrypt and GenerateDataKey. You can also change the KMS key that's associated with the alias (UpdateAlias) or delete the alias (DeleteAlias) at any time. These operations don't affect the underlying KMS key.

You can associate the alias with any customer managed key in the same Amazon Web Services Region. Each alias is associated with only one KMS key at a time, but a KMS key can have multiple aliases. A valid KMS key is required. You can't create an alias without a KMS key.

The alias must be unique in the account and Region, but you can have aliases with the same name in different Regions. For detailed information about aliases, see Using aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation does not return a response. To get the alias that you created, use the ListAliases operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on an alias in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • DeleteAlias

  • ListAliases

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ CreateCustomKeyStore()

virtual Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateCustomKeyStore ( const Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a custom key store that is associated with an CloudHSM cluster that you own and manage.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Before you create the custom key store, you must assemble the required elements, including an CloudHSM cluster that fulfills the requirements for a custom key store. For details about the required elements, see Assemble the Prerequisites in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When the operation completes successfully, it returns the ID of the new custom key store. Before you can use your new custom key store, you need to use the ConnectCustomKeyStore operation to connect the new key store to its CloudHSM cluster. Even if you are not going to use your custom key store immediately, you might want to connect it to verify that all settings are correct and then disconnect it until you are ready to use it.

For help with failures, see Troubleshooting a Custom Key Store in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CreateCustomKeyStore (IAM policy).

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ CreateCustomKeyStoreAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateCustomKeyStoreAsync ( const Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreRequest request,
const CreateCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Creates a custom key store that is associated with an CloudHSM cluster that you own and manage.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Before you create the custom key store, you must assemble the required elements, including an CloudHSM cluster that fulfills the requirements for a custom key store. For details about the required elements, see Assemble the Prerequisites in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When the operation completes successfully, it returns the ID of the new custom key store. Before you can use your new custom key store, you need to use the ConnectCustomKeyStore operation to connect the new key store to its CloudHSM cluster. Even if you are not going to use your custom key store immediately, you might want to connect it to verify that all settings are correct and then disconnect it until you are ready to use it.

For help with failures, see Troubleshooting a Custom Key Store in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CreateCustomKeyStore (IAM policy).

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ CreateCustomKeyStoreCallable()

virtual Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateCustomKeyStoreCallable ( const Model::CreateCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a custom key store that is associated with an CloudHSM cluster that you own and manage.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Before you create the custom key store, you must assemble the required elements, including an CloudHSM cluster that fulfills the requirements for a custom key store. For details about the required elements, see Assemble the Prerequisites in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When the operation completes successfully, it returns the ID of the new custom key store. Before you can use your new custom key store, you need to use the ConnectCustomKeyStore operation to connect the new key store to its CloudHSM cluster. Even if you are not going to use your custom key store immediately, you might want to connect it to verify that all settings are correct and then disconnect it until you are ready to use it.

For help with failures, see Troubleshooting a Custom Key Store in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CreateCustomKeyStore (IAM policy).

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ CreateGrant()

virtual Model::CreateGrantOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateGrant ( const Model::CreateGrantRequest request) const
virtual

Adds a grant to a KMS key.

A grant is a policy instrument that allows Amazon Web Services principals to use KMS keys in cryptographic operations. It also can allow them to view a KMS key (DescribeKey) and create and manage grants. When authorizing access to a KMS key, grants are considered along with key policies and IAM policies. Grants are often used for temporary permissions because you can create one, use its permissions, and delete it without changing your key policies or IAM policies.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

The CreateGrant operation returns a GrantToken and a GrantId.

  • When you create, retire, or revoke a grant, there might be a brief delay, usually less than five minutes, until the grant is available throughout KMS. This state is known as eventual consistency. Once the grant has achieved eventual consistency, the grantee principal can use the permissions in the grant without identifying the grant.

    However, to use the permissions in the grant immediately, use the GrantToken that CreateGrant returns. For details, see Using a grant token in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

  • The CreateGrant operation also returns a GrantId. You can use the GrantId and a key identifier to identify the grant in the RetireGrant and RevokeGrant operations. To find the grant ID, use the ListGrants or ListRetirableGrants operations.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:CreateGrant (key policy)

Related operations:

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ CreateGrantAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateGrantAsync ( const Model::CreateGrantRequest request,
const CreateGrantResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Adds a grant to a KMS key.

A grant is a policy instrument that allows Amazon Web Services principals to use KMS keys in cryptographic operations. It also can allow them to view a KMS key (DescribeKey) and create and manage grants. When authorizing access to a KMS key, grants are considered along with key policies and IAM policies. Grants are often used for temporary permissions because you can create one, use its permissions, and delete it without changing your key policies or IAM policies.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

The CreateGrant operation returns a GrantToken and a GrantId.

  • When you create, retire, or revoke a grant, there might be a brief delay, usually less than five minutes, until the grant is available throughout KMS. This state is known as eventual consistency. Once the grant has achieved eventual consistency, the grantee principal can use the permissions in the grant without identifying the grant.

    However, to use the permissions in the grant immediately, use the GrantToken that CreateGrant returns. For details, see Using a grant token in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

  • The CreateGrant operation also returns a GrantId. You can use the GrantId and a key identifier to identify the grant in the RetireGrant and RevokeGrant operations. To find the grant ID, use the ListGrants or ListRetirableGrants operations.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:CreateGrant (key policy)

Related operations:

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ CreateGrantCallable()

virtual Model::CreateGrantOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateGrantCallable ( const Model::CreateGrantRequest request) const
virtual

Adds a grant to a KMS key.

A grant is a policy instrument that allows Amazon Web Services principals to use KMS keys in cryptographic operations. It also can allow them to view a KMS key (DescribeKey) and create and manage grants. When authorizing access to a KMS key, grants are considered along with key policies and IAM policies. Grants are often used for temporary permissions because you can create one, use its permissions, and delete it without changing your key policies or IAM policies.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

The CreateGrant operation returns a GrantToken and a GrantId.

  • When you create, retire, or revoke a grant, there might be a brief delay, usually less than five minutes, until the grant is available throughout KMS. This state is known as eventual consistency. Once the grant has achieved eventual consistency, the grantee principal can use the permissions in the grant without identifying the grant.

    However, to use the permissions in the grant immediately, use the GrantToken that CreateGrant returns. For details, see Using a grant token in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

  • The CreateGrant operation also returns a GrantId. You can use the GrantId and a key identifier to identify the grant in the RetireGrant and RevokeGrant operations. To find the grant ID, use the ListGrants or ListRetirableGrants operations.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:CreateGrant (key policy)

Related operations:

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ CreateKey()

virtual Model::CreateKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateKey ( const Model::CreateKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a unique customer managed KMS key in your Amazon Web Services account and Region.

KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term.

You can use the CreateKey operation to create symmetric or asymmetric KMS keys.

  • Symmetric KMS keys contain a 256-bit symmetric key that never leaves KMS unencrypted. To use the KMS key, you must call KMS. You can use a symmetric KMS key to encrypt and decrypt small amounts of data, but they are typically used to generate data keys and data keys pairs. For details, see GenerateDataKey and GenerateDataKeyPair.

  • Asymmetric KMS keys can contain an RSA key pair or an Elliptic Curve (ECC) key pair. The private key in an asymmetric KMS key never leaves KMS unencrypted. However, you can use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key so it can be used outside of KMS. KMS keys with RSA key pairs can be used to encrypt or decrypt data or sign and verify messages (but not both). KMS keys with ECC key pairs can be used only to sign and verify messages.

For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To create different types of KMS keys, use the following guidance:

Asymmetric KMS keys

To create an asymmetric KMS key, use the KeySpec parameter to specify the type of key material in the KMS key. Then, use the KeyUsage parameter to determine whether the KMS key will be used to encrypt and decrypt or sign and verify. You can't change these properties after the KMS key is created.

Symmetric KMS keys

When creating a symmetric KMS key, you don't need to specify the KeySpec or KeyUsage parameters. The default value for KeySpec, SYMMETRIC_DEFAULT, and the default value for KeyUsage, ENCRYPT_DECRYPT, are the only valid values for symmetric KMS keys.

Multi-Region primary keys
Imported key material

To create a multi-Region primary key in the local Amazon Web Services Region, use the MultiRegion parameter with a value of True. To create a multi-Region replica key, that is, a KMS key with the same key ID and key material as a primary key, but in a different Amazon Web Services Region, use the ReplicateKey operation. To change a replica key to a primary key, and its primary key to a replica key, use the UpdatePrimaryRegion operation.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You can create symmetric and asymmetric multi-Region keys and multi-Region keys with imported key material. You cannot create multi-Region keys in a custom key store.

To import your own key material, begin by creating a symmetric KMS key with no key material. To do this, use the Origin parameter of CreateKey with a value of EXTERNAL. Next, use GetParametersForImport operation to get a public key and import token, and use the public key to encrypt your key material. Then, use ImportKeyMaterial with your import token to import the key material. For step-by-step instructions, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . You cannot import the key material into an asymmetric KMS key.

To create a multi-Region primary key with imported key material, use the Origin parameter of CreateKey with a value of EXTERNAL and the MultiRegion parameter with a value of True. To create replicas of the multi-Region primary key, use the ReplicateKey operation. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Custom key store

To create a symmetric KMS key in a custom key store, use the CustomKeyStoreId parameter to specify the custom key store. You must also use the Origin parameter with a value of AWS_CLOUDHSM. The CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store must have at least two active HSMs in different Availability Zones in the Amazon Web Services Region.

You cannot create an asymmetric KMS key in a custom key store. For information about custom key stores in KMS see Using Custom Key Stores in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation to create a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CreateKey (IAM policy). To use the Tags parameter, kms:TagResource (IAM policy). For examples and information about related permissions, see Allow a user to create KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • DescribeKey

  • ListKeys

  • ScheduleKeyDeletion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ CreateKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateKeyAsync ( const Model::CreateKeyRequest request,
const CreateKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Creates a unique customer managed KMS key in your Amazon Web Services account and Region.

KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term.

You can use the CreateKey operation to create symmetric or asymmetric KMS keys.

  • Symmetric KMS keys contain a 256-bit symmetric key that never leaves KMS unencrypted. To use the KMS key, you must call KMS. You can use a symmetric KMS key to encrypt and decrypt small amounts of data, but they are typically used to generate data keys and data keys pairs. For details, see GenerateDataKey and GenerateDataKeyPair.

  • Asymmetric KMS keys can contain an RSA key pair or an Elliptic Curve (ECC) key pair. The private key in an asymmetric KMS key never leaves KMS unencrypted. However, you can use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key so it can be used outside of KMS. KMS keys with RSA key pairs can be used to encrypt or decrypt data or sign and verify messages (but not both). KMS keys with ECC key pairs can be used only to sign and verify messages.

For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To create different types of KMS keys, use the following guidance:

Asymmetric KMS keys

To create an asymmetric KMS key, use the KeySpec parameter to specify the type of key material in the KMS key. Then, use the KeyUsage parameter to determine whether the KMS key will be used to encrypt and decrypt or sign and verify. You can't change these properties after the KMS key is created.

Symmetric KMS keys

When creating a symmetric KMS key, you don't need to specify the KeySpec or KeyUsage parameters. The default value for KeySpec, SYMMETRIC_DEFAULT, and the default value for KeyUsage, ENCRYPT_DECRYPT, are the only valid values for symmetric KMS keys.

Multi-Region primary keys
Imported key material

To create a multi-Region primary key in the local Amazon Web Services Region, use the MultiRegion parameter with a value of True. To create a multi-Region replica key, that is, a KMS key with the same key ID and key material as a primary key, but in a different Amazon Web Services Region, use the ReplicateKey operation. To change a replica key to a primary key, and its primary key to a replica key, use the UpdatePrimaryRegion operation.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You can create symmetric and asymmetric multi-Region keys and multi-Region keys with imported key material. You cannot create multi-Region keys in a custom key store.

To import your own key material, begin by creating a symmetric KMS key with no key material. To do this, use the Origin parameter of CreateKey with a value of EXTERNAL. Next, use GetParametersForImport operation to get a public key and import token, and use the public key to encrypt your key material. Then, use ImportKeyMaterial with your import token to import the key material. For step-by-step instructions, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . You cannot import the key material into an asymmetric KMS key.

To create a multi-Region primary key with imported key material, use the Origin parameter of CreateKey with a value of EXTERNAL and the MultiRegion parameter with a value of True. To create replicas of the multi-Region primary key, use the ReplicateKey operation. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Custom key store

To create a symmetric KMS key in a custom key store, use the CustomKeyStoreId parameter to specify the custom key store. You must also use the Origin parameter with a value of AWS_CLOUDHSM. The CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store must have at least two active HSMs in different Availability Zones in the Amazon Web Services Region.

You cannot create an asymmetric KMS key in a custom key store. For information about custom key stores in KMS see Using Custom Key Stores in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation to create a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CreateKey (IAM policy). To use the Tags parameter, kms:TagResource (IAM policy). For examples and information about related permissions, see Allow a user to create KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • DescribeKey

  • ListKeys

  • ScheduleKeyDeletion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ CreateKeyCallable()

virtual Model::CreateKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::CreateKeyCallable ( const Model::CreateKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a unique customer managed KMS key in your Amazon Web Services account and Region.

KMS is replacing the term customer master key (CMK) with KMS key and KMS key. The concept has not changed. To prevent breaking changes, KMS is keeping some variations of this term.

You can use the CreateKey operation to create symmetric or asymmetric KMS keys.

  • Symmetric KMS keys contain a 256-bit symmetric key that never leaves KMS unencrypted. To use the KMS key, you must call KMS. You can use a symmetric KMS key to encrypt and decrypt small amounts of data, but they are typically used to generate data keys and data keys pairs. For details, see GenerateDataKey and GenerateDataKeyPair.

  • Asymmetric KMS keys can contain an RSA key pair or an Elliptic Curve (ECC) key pair. The private key in an asymmetric KMS key never leaves KMS unencrypted. However, you can use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key so it can be used outside of KMS. KMS keys with RSA key pairs can be used to encrypt or decrypt data or sign and verify messages (but not both). KMS keys with ECC key pairs can be used only to sign and verify messages.

For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To create different types of KMS keys, use the following guidance:

Asymmetric KMS keys

To create an asymmetric KMS key, use the KeySpec parameter to specify the type of key material in the KMS key. Then, use the KeyUsage parameter to determine whether the KMS key will be used to encrypt and decrypt or sign and verify. You can't change these properties after the KMS key is created.

Symmetric KMS keys

When creating a symmetric KMS key, you don't need to specify the KeySpec or KeyUsage parameters. The default value for KeySpec, SYMMETRIC_DEFAULT, and the default value for KeyUsage, ENCRYPT_DECRYPT, are the only valid values for symmetric KMS keys.

Multi-Region primary keys
Imported key material

To create a multi-Region primary key in the local Amazon Web Services Region, use the MultiRegion parameter with a value of True. To create a multi-Region replica key, that is, a KMS key with the same key ID and key material as a primary key, but in a different Amazon Web Services Region, use the ReplicateKey operation. To change a replica key to a primary key, and its primary key to a replica key, use the UpdatePrimaryRegion operation.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You can create symmetric and asymmetric multi-Region keys and multi-Region keys with imported key material. You cannot create multi-Region keys in a custom key store.

To import your own key material, begin by creating a symmetric KMS key with no key material. To do this, use the Origin parameter of CreateKey with a value of EXTERNAL. Next, use GetParametersForImport operation to get a public key and import token, and use the public key to encrypt your key material. Then, use ImportKeyMaterial with your import token to import the key material. For step-by-step instructions, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . You cannot import the key material into an asymmetric KMS key.

To create a multi-Region primary key with imported key material, use the Origin parameter of CreateKey with a value of EXTERNAL and the MultiRegion parameter with a value of True. To create replicas of the multi-Region primary key, use the ReplicateKey operation. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Custom key store

To create a symmetric KMS key in a custom key store, use the CustomKeyStoreId parameter to specify the custom key store. You must also use the Origin parameter with a value of AWS_CLOUDHSM. The CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store must have at least two active HSMs in different Availability Zones in the Amazon Web Services Region.

You cannot create an asymmetric KMS key in a custom key store. For information about custom key stores in KMS see Using Custom Key Stores in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation to create a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:CreateKey (IAM policy). To use the Tags parameter, kms:TagResource (IAM policy). For examples and information about related permissions, see Allow a user to create KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • DescribeKey

  • ListKeys

  • ScheduleKeyDeletion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ Decrypt()

virtual Model::DecryptOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::Decrypt ( const Model::DecryptRequest request) const
virtual

Decrypts ciphertext that was encrypted by a KMS key using any of the following operations:

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

You can use this operation to decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted under a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key. When the KMS key is asymmetric, you must specify the KMS key and the encryption algorithm that was used to encrypt the ciphertext. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The Decrypt operation also decrypts ciphertext that was encrypted outside of KMS by the public key in an KMS asymmetric KMS key. However, it cannot decrypt ciphertext produced by other libraries, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK or Amazon S3 client-side encryption. These libraries return a ciphertext format that is incompatible with KMS.

If the ciphertext was encrypted under a symmetric KMS key, the KeyId parameter is optional. KMS can get this information from metadata that it adds to the symmetric ciphertext blob. This feature adds durability to your implementation by ensuring that authorized users can decrypt ciphertext decades after it was encrypted, even if they've lost track of the key ID. However, specifying the KMS key is always recommended as a best practice. When you use the KeyId parameter to specify a KMS key, KMS only uses the KMS key you specify. If the ciphertext was encrypted under a different KMS key, the Decrypt operation fails. This practice ensures that you use the KMS key that you intend.

Whenever possible, use key policies to give users permission to call the Decrypt operation on a particular KMS key, instead of using IAM policies. Otherwise, you might create an IAM user policy that gives the user Decrypt permission on all KMS keys. This user could decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by KMS keys in other accounts if the key policy for the cross-account KMS key permits it. If you must use an IAM policy for Decrypt permissions, limit the user to particular KMS keys or particular trusted accounts. For details, see Best practices for IAM policies in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Decrypt (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • ReEncrypt

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DecryptAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DecryptAsync ( const Model::DecryptRequest request,
const DecryptResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Decrypts ciphertext that was encrypted by a KMS key using any of the following operations:

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

You can use this operation to decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted under a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key. When the KMS key is asymmetric, you must specify the KMS key and the encryption algorithm that was used to encrypt the ciphertext. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The Decrypt operation also decrypts ciphertext that was encrypted outside of KMS by the public key in an KMS asymmetric KMS key. However, it cannot decrypt ciphertext produced by other libraries, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK or Amazon S3 client-side encryption. These libraries return a ciphertext format that is incompatible with KMS.

If the ciphertext was encrypted under a symmetric KMS key, the KeyId parameter is optional. KMS can get this information from metadata that it adds to the symmetric ciphertext blob. This feature adds durability to your implementation by ensuring that authorized users can decrypt ciphertext decades after it was encrypted, even if they've lost track of the key ID. However, specifying the KMS key is always recommended as a best practice. When you use the KeyId parameter to specify a KMS key, KMS only uses the KMS key you specify. If the ciphertext was encrypted under a different KMS key, the Decrypt operation fails. This practice ensures that you use the KMS key that you intend.

Whenever possible, use key policies to give users permission to call the Decrypt operation on a particular KMS key, instead of using IAM policies. Otherwise, you might create an IAM user policy that gives the user Decrypt permission on all KMS keys. This user could decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by KMS keys in other accounts if the key policy for the cross-account KMS key permits it. If you must use an IAM policy for Decrypt permissions, limit the user to particular KMS keys or particular trusted accounts. For details, see Best practices for IAM policies in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Decrypt (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • ReEncrypt

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DecryptCallable()

virtual Model::DecryptOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DecryptCallable ( const Model::DecryptRequest request) const
virtual

Decrypts ciphertext that was encrypted by a KMS key using any of the following operations:

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

You can use this operation to decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted under a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key. When the KMS key is asymmetric, you must specify the KMS key and the encryption algorithm that was used to encrypt the ciphertext. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The Decrypt operation also decrypts ciphertext that was encrypted outside of KMS by the public key in an KMS asymmetric KMS key. However, it cannot decrypt ciphertext produced by other libraries, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK or Amazon S3 client-side encryption. These libraries return a ciphertext format that is incompatible with KMS.

If the ciphertext was encrypted under a symmetric KMS key, the KeyId parameter is optional. KMS can get this information from metadata that it adds to the symmetric ciphertext blob. This feature adds durability to your implementation by ensuring that authorized users can decrypt ciphertext decades after it was encrypted, even if they've lost track of the key ID. However, specifying the KMS key is always recommended as a best practice. When you use the KeyId parameter to specify a KMS key, KMS only uses the KMS key you specify. If the ciphertext was encrypted under a different KMS key, the Decrypt operation fails. This practice ensures that you use the KMS key that you intend.

Whenever possible, use key policies to give users permission to call the Decrypt operation on a particular KMS key, instead of using IAM policies. Otherwise, you might create an IAM user policy that gives the user Decrypt permission on all KMS keys. This user could decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by KMS keys in other accounts if the key policy for the cross-account KMS key permits it. If you must use an IAM policy for Decrypt permissions, limit the user to particular KMS keys or particular trusted accounts. For details, see Best practices for IAM policies in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Decrypt (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • ReEncrypt

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DeleteAlias()

virtual Model::DeleteAliasOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteAlias ( const Model::DeleteAliasRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes the specified alias.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Because an alias is not a property of a KMS key, you can delete and change the aliases of a KMS key without affecting the KMS key. Also, aliases do not appear in the response from the DescribeKey operation. To get the aliases of all KMS keys, use the ListAliases operation.

Each KMS key can have multiple aliases. To change the alias of a KMS key, use DeleteAlias to delete the current alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias. To associate an existing alias with a different KMS key, call UpdateAlias.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on an alias in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • ListAliases

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DeleteAliasAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteAliasAsync ( const Model::DeleteAliasRequest request,
const DeleteAliasResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Deletes the specified alias.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Because an alias is not a property of a KMS key, you can delete and change the aliases of a KMS key without affecting the KMS key. Also, aliases do not appear in the response from the DescribeKey operation. To get the aliases of all KMS keys, use the ListAliases operation.

Each KMS key can have multiple aliases. To change the alias of a KMS key, use DeleteAlias to delete the current alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias. To associate an existing alias with a different KMS key, call UpdateAlias.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on an alias in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • ListAliases

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DeleteAliasCallable()

virtual Model::DeleteAliasOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteAliasCallable ( const Model::DeleteAliasRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes the specified alias.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Because an alias is not a property of a KMS key, you can delete and change the aliases of a KMS key without affecting the KMS key. Also, aliases do not appear in the response from the DescribeKey operation. To get the aliases of all KMS keys, use the ListAliases operation.

Each KMS key can have multiple aliases. To change the alias of a KMS key, use DeleteAlias to delete the current alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias. To associate an existing alias with a different KMS key, call UpdateAlias.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on an alias in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • ListAliases

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DeleteCustomKeyStore()

virtual Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteCustomKeyStore ( const Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes a custom key store. This operation does not delete the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store, or affect any users or keys in the cluster.

The custom key store that you delete cannot contain any KMS KMS keys. Before deleting the key store, verify that you will never need to use any of the KMS keys in the key store for any cryptographic operations. Then, use ScheduleKeyDeletion to delete the KMS keys from the key store. When the scheduled waiting period expires, the ScheduleKeyDeletion operation deletes the KMS keys. Then it makes a best effort to delete the key material from the associated cluster. However, you might need to manually delete the orphaned key material from the cluster and its backups.

After all KMS keys are deleted from KMS, use DisconnectCustomKeyStore to disconnect the key store from KMS. Then, you can delete the custom key store.

Instead of deleting the custom key store, consider using DisconnectCustomKeyStore to disconnect it from KMS. While the key store is disconnected, you cannot create or use the KMS keys in the key store. But, you do not need to delete KMS keys and you can reconnect a disconnected custom key store at any time.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DeleteCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DeleteCustomKeyStoreAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteCustomKeyStoreAsync ( const Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreRequest request,
const DeleteCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Deletes a custom key store. This operation does not delete the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store, or affect any users or keys in the cluster.

The custom key store that you delete cannot contain any KMS KMS keys. Before deleting the key store, verify that you will never need to use any of the KMS keys in the key store for any cryptographic operations. Then, use ScheduleKeyDeletion to delete the KMS keys from the key store. When the scheduled waiting period expires, the ScheduleKeyDeletion operation deletes the KMS keys. Then it makes a best effort to delete the key material from the associated cluster. However, you might need to manually delete the orphaned key material from the cluster and its backups.

After all KMS keys are deleted from KMS, use DisconnectCustomKeyStore to disconnect the key store from KMS. Then, you can delete the custom key store.

Instead of deleting the custom key store, consider using DisconnectCustomKeyStore to disconnect it from KMS. While the key store is disconnected, you cannot create or use the KMS keys in the key store. But, you do not need to delete KMS keys and you can reconnect a disconnected custom key store at any time.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DeleteCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DeleteCustomKeyStoreCallable()

virtual Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteCustomKeyStoreCallable ( const Model::DeleteCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes a custom key store. This operation does not delete the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with the custom key store, or affect any users or keys in the cluster.

The custom key store that you delete cannot contain any KMS KMS keys. Before deleting the key store, verify that you will never need to use any of the KMS keys in the key store for any cryptographic operations. Then, use ScheduleKeyDeletion to delete the KMS keys from the key store. When the scheduled waiting period expires, the ScheduleKeyDeletion operation deletes the KMS keys. Then it makes a best effort to delete the key material from the associated cluster. However, you might need to manually delete the orphaned key material from the cluster and its backups.

After all KMS keys are deleted from KMS, use DisconnectCustomKeyStore to disconnect the key store from KMS. Then, you can delete the custom key store.

Instead of deleting the custom key store, consider using DisconnectCustomKeyStore to disconnect it from KMS. While the key store is disconnected, you cannot create or use the KMS keys in the key store. But, you do not need to delete KMS keys and you can reconnect a disconnected custom key store at any time.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DeleteCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DeleteImportedKeyMaterial()

virtual Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteImportedKeyMaterial ( const Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes key material that you previously imported. This operation makes the specified KMS key unusable. For more information about importing key material into KMS, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When the specified KMS key is in the PendingDeletion state, this operation does not change the KMS key's state. Otherwise, it changes the KMS key's state to PendingImport.

After you delete key material, you can use ImportKeyMaterial to reimport the same key material into the KMS key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DeleteImportedKeyMaterial (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetParametersForImport

  • ImportKeyMaterial

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DeleteImportedKeyMaterialAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialAsync ( const Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialRequest request,
const DeleteImportedKeyMaterialResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Deletes key material that you previously imported. This operation makes the specified KMS key unusable. For more information about importing key material into KMS, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When the specified KMS key is in the PendingDeletion state, this operation does not change the KMS key's state. Otherwise, it changes the KMS key's state to PendingImport.

After you delete key material, you can use ImportKeyMaterial to reimport the same key material into the KMS key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DeleteImportedKeyMaterial (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetParametersForImport

  • ImportKeyMaterial

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DeleteImportedKeyMaterialCallable()

virtual Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialCallable ( const Model::DeleteImportedKeyMaterialRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes key material that you previously imported. This operation makes the specified KMS key unusable. For more information about importing key material into KMS, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When the specified KMS key is in the PendingDeletion state, this operation does not change the KMS key's state. Otherwise, it changes the KMS key's state to PendingImport.

After you delete key material, you can use ImportKeyMaterial to reimport the same key material into the KMS key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DeleteImportedKeyMaterial (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetParametersForImport

  • ImportKeyMaterial

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DescribeCustomKeyStores()

virtual Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DescribeCustomKeyStores ( const Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresRequest request) const
virtual

Gets information about custom key stores in the account and Region.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

By default, this operation returns information about all custom key stores in the account and Region. To get only information about a particular custom key store, use either the CustomKeyStoreName or CustomKeyStoreId parameter (but not both).

To determine whether the custom key store is connected to its CloudHSM cluster, use the ConnectionState element in the response. If an attempt to connect the custom key store failed, the ConnectionState value is FAILED and the ConnectionErrorCode element in the response indicates the cause of the failure. For help interpreting the ConnectionErrorCode, see CustomKeyStoresListEntry.

Custom key stores have a DISCONNECTED connection state if the key store has never been connected or you use the DisconnectCustomKeyStore operation to disconnect it. If your custom key store state is CONNECTED but you are having trouble using it, make sure that its associated CloudHSM cluster is active and contains the minimum number of HSMs required for the operation, if any.

For help repairing your custom key store, see the Troubleshooting Custom Key Stores topic in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DescribeCustomKeyStores (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DescribeCustomKeyStoresAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DescribeCustomKeyStoresAsync ( const Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresRequest request,
const DescribeCustomKeyStoresResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets information about custom key stores in the account and Region.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

By default, this operation returns information about all custom key stores in the account and Region. To get only information about a particular custom key store, use either the CustomKeyStoreName or CustomKeyStoreId parameter (but not both).

To determine whether the custom key store is connected to its CloudHSM cluster, use the ConnectionState element in the response. If an attempt to connect the custom key store failed, the ConnectionState value is FAILED and the ConnectionErrorCode element in the response indicates the cause of the failure. For help interpreting the ConnectionErrorCode, see CustomKeyStoresListEntry.

Custom key stores have a DISCONNECTED connection state if the key store has never been connected or you use the DisconnectCustomKeyStore operation to disconnect it. If your custom key store state is CONNECTED but you are having trouble using it, make sure that its associated CloudHSM cluster is active and contains the minimum number of HSMs required for the operation, if any.

For help repairing your custom key store, see the Troubleshooting Custom Key Stores topic in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DescribeCustomKeyStores (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DescribeCustomKeyStoresCallable()

virtual Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DescribeCustomKeyStoresCallable ( const Model::DescribeCustomKeyStoresRequest request) const
virtual

Gets information about custom key stores in the account and Region.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

By default, this operation returns information about all custom key stores in the account and Region. To get only information about a particular custom key store, use either the CustomKeyStoreName or CustomKeyStoreId parameter (but not both).

To determine whether the custom key store is connected to its CloudHSM cluster, use the ConnectionState element in the response. If an attempt to connect the custom key store failed, the ConnectionState value is FAILED and the ConnectionErrorCode element in the response indicates the cause of the failure. For help interpreting the ConnectionErrorCode, see CustomKeyStoresListEntry.

Custom key stores have a DISCONNECTED connection state if the key store has never been connected or you use the DisconnectCustomKeyStore operation to disconnect it. If your custom key store state is CONNECTED but you are having trouble using it, make sure that its associated CloudHSM cluster is active and contains the minimum number of HSMs required for the operation, if any.

For help repairing your custom key store, see the Troubleshooting Custom Key Stores topic in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DescribeCustomKeyStores (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DescribeKey()

virtual Model::DescribeKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DescribeKey ( const Model::DescribeKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Provides detailed information about a KMS key. You can run DescribeKey on a customer managed key or an Amazon Web Services managed key.

This detailed information includes the key ARN, creation date (and deletion date, if applicable), the key state, and the origin and expiration date (if any) of the key material. It includes fields, like KeySpec, that help you distinguish symmetric from asymmetric KMS keys. It also provides information that is particularly important to asymmetric keys, such as the key usage (encryption or signing) and the encryption algorithms or signing algorithms that the KMS key supports. For KMS keys in custom key stores, it includes information about the custom key store, such as the key store ID and the CloudHSM cluster ID. For multi-Region keys, it displays the primary key and all related replica keys.

DescribeKey does not return the following information:

  • Aliases associated with the KMS key. To get this information, use ListAliases.

  • Whether automatic key rotation is enabled on the KMS key. To get this information, use GetKeyRotationStatus. Also, some key states prevent a KMS key from being automatically rotated. For details, see How Automatic Key Rotation Works in Key Management Service Developer Guide.

  • Tags on the KMS key. To get this information, use ListResourceTags.

  • Key policies and grants on the KMS key. To get this information, use GetKeyPolicy and ListGrants.

If you call the DescribeKey operation on a predefined Amazon Web Services alias, that is, an Amazon Web Services alias with no key ID, KMS creates an Amazon Web Services managed key. Then, it associates the alias with the new KMS key, and returns the KeyId and Arn of the new KMS key in the response.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:DescribeKey (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetKeyPolicy

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

  • ListAliases

  • ListGrants

  • ListKeys

  • ListResourceTags

  • ListRetirableGrants

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DescribeKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DescribeKeyAsync ( const Model::DescribeKeyRequest request,
const DescribeKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Provides detailed information about a KMS key. You can run DescribeKey on a customer managed key or an Amazon Web Services managed key.

This detailed information includes the key ARN, creation date (and deletion date, if applicable), the key state, and the origin and expiration date (if any) of the key material. It includes fields, like KeySpec, that help you distinguish symmetric from asymmetric KMS keys. It also provides information that is particularly important to asymmetric keys, such as the key usage (encryption or signing) and the encryption algorithms or signing algorithms that the KMS key supports. For KMS keys in custom key stores, it includes information about the custom key store, such as the key store ID and the CloudHSM cluster ID. For multi-Region keys, it displays the primary key and all related replica keys.

DescribeKey does not return the following information:

  • Aliases associated with the KMS key. To get this information, use ListAliases.

  • Whether automatic key rotation is enabled on the KMS key. To get this information, use GetKeyRotationStatus. Also, some key states prevent a KMS key from being automatically rotated. For details, see How Automatic Key Rotation Works in Key Management Service Developer Guide.

  • Tags on the KMS key. To get this information, use ListResourceTags.

  • Key policies and grants on the KMS key. To get this information, use GetKeyPolicy and ListGrants.

If you call the DescribeKey operation on a predefined Amazon Web Services alias, that is, an Amazon Web Services alias with no key ID, KMS creates an Amazon Web Services managed key. Then, it associates the alias with the new KMS key, and returns the KeyId and Arn of the new KMS key in the response.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:DescribeKey (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetKeyPolicy

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

  • ListAliases

  • ListGrants

  • ListKeys

  • ListResourceTags

  • ListRetirableGrants

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DescribeKeyCallable()

virtual Model::DescribeKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DescribeKeyCallable ( const Model::DescribeKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Provides detailed information about a KMS key. You can run DescribeKey on a customer managed key or an Amazon Web Services managed key.

This detailed information includes the key ARN, creation date (and deletion date, if applicable), the key state, and the origin and expiration date (if any) of the key material. It includes fields, like KeySpec, that help you distinguish symmetric from asymmetric KMS keys. It also provides information that is particularly important to asymmetric keys, such as the key usage (encryption or signing) and the encryption algorithms or signing algorithms that the KMS key supports. For KMS keys in custom key stores, it includes information about the custom key store, such as the key store ID and the CloudHSM cluster ID. For multi-Region keys, it displays the primary key and all related replica keys.

DescribeKey does not return the following information:

  • Aliases associated with the KMS key. To get this information, use ListAliases.

  • Whether automatic key rotation is enabled on the KMS key. To get this information, use GetKeyRotationStatus. Also, some key states prevent a KMS key from being automatically rotated. For details, see How Automatic Key Rotation Works in Key Management Service Developer Guide.

  • Tags on the KMS key. To get this information, use ListResourceTags.

  • Key policies and grants on the KMS key. To get this information, use GetKeyPolicy and ListGrants.

If you call the DescribeKey operation on a predefined Amazon Web Services alias, that is, an Amazon Web Services alias with no key ID, KMS creates an Amazon Web Services managed key. Then, it associates the alias with the new KMS key, and returns the KeyId and Arn of the new KMS key in the response.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:DescribeKey (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetKeyPolicy

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

  • ListAliases

  • ListGrants

  • ListKeys

  • ListResourceTags

  • ListRetirableGrants

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DisableKey()

virtual Model::DisableKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisableKey ( const Model::DisableKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Sets the state of a KMS key to disabled. This change temporarily prevents use of the KMS key for cryptographic operations.

For more information about how key state affects the use of a KMS key, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisableKey (key policy)

Related operations: EnableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DisableKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisableKeyAsync ( const Model::DisableKeyRequest request,
const DisableKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Sets the state of a KMS key to disabled. This change temporarily prevents use of the KMS key for cryptographic operations.

For more information about how key state affects the use of a KMS key, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisableKey (key policy)

Related operations: EnableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DisableKeyCallable()

virtual Model::DisableKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisableKeyCallable ( const Model::DisableKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Sets the state of a KMS key to disabled. This change temporarily prevents use of the KMS key for cryptographic operations.

For more information about how key state affects the use of a KMS key, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisableKey (key policy)

Related operations: EnableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DisableKeyRotation()

virtual Model::DisableKeyRotationOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisableKeyRotation ( const Model::DisableKeyRotationRequest request) const
virtual

Disables automatic rotation of the key material for the specified symmetric KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisableKeyRotation (key policy)

Related operations:

  • EnableKeyRotation

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DisableKeyRotationAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisableKeyRotationAsync ( const Model::DisableKeyRotationRequest request,
const DisableKeyRotationResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Disables automatic rotation of the key material for the specified symmetric KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisableKeyRotation (key policy)

Related operations:

  • EnableKeyRotation

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DisableKeyRotationCallable()

virtual Model::DisableKeyRotationOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisableKeyRotationCallable ( const Model::DisableKeyRotationRequest request) const
virtual

Disables automatic rotation of the key material for the specified symmetric KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisableKeyRotation (key policy)

Related operations:

  • EnableKeyRotation

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ DisconnectCustomKeyStore()

virtual Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisconnectCustomKeyStore ( const Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Disconnects the custom key store from its associated CloudHSM cluster. While a custom key store is disconnected, you can manage the custom key store and its KMS keys, but you cannot create or use KMS keys in the custom key store. You can reconnect the custom key store at any time.

While a custom key store is disconnected, all attempts to create KMS keys in the custom key store or to use existing KMS keys in cryptographic operations will fail. This action can prevent users from storing and accessing sensitive data.

To find the connection state of a custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation. To reconnect a custom key store, use the ConnectCustomKeyStore operation.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisconnectCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ DisconnectCustomKeyStoreAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreAsync ( const Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreRequest request,
const DisconnectCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Disconnects the custom key store from its associated CloudHSM cluster. While a custom key store is disconnected, you can manage the custom key store and its KMS keys, but you cannot create or use KMS keys in the custom key store. You can reconnect the custom key store at any time.

While a custom key store is disconnected, all attempts to create KMS keys in the custom key store or to use existing KMS keys in cryptographic operations will fail. This action can prevent users from storing and accessing sensitive data.

To find the connection state of a custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation. To reconnect a custom key store, use the ConnectCustomKeyStore operation.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisconnectCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ DisconnectCustomKeyStoreCallable()

virtual Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreCallable ( const Model::DisconnectCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Disconnects the custom key store from its associated CloudHSM cluster. While a custom key store is disconnected, you can manage the custom key store and its KMS keys, but you cannot create or use KMS keys in the custom key store. You can reconnect the custom key store at any time.

While a custom key store is disconnected, all attempts to create KMS keys in the custom key store or to use existing KMS keys in cryptographic operations will fail. This action can prevent users from storing and accessing sensitive data.

To find the connection state of a custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation. To reconnect a custom key store, use the ConnectCustomKeyStore operation.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:DisconnectCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • UpdateCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ EnableKey()

virtual Model::EnableKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EnableKey ( const Model::EnableKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Sets the key state of a KMS key to enabled. This allows you to use the KMS key for cryptographic operations.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:EnableKey (key policy)

Related operations: DisableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ EnableKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EnableKeyAsync ( const Model::EnableKeyRequest request,
const EnableKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Sets the key state of a KMS key to enabled. This allows you to use the KMS key for cryptographic operations.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:EnableKey (key policy)

Related operations: DisableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ EnableKeyCallable()

virtual Model::EnableKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EnableKeyCallable ( const Model::EnableKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Sets the key state of a KMS key to enabled. This allows you to use the KMS key for cryptographic operations.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:EnableKey (key policy)

Related operations: DisableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ EnableKeyRotation()

virtual Model::EnableKeyRotationOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EnableKeyRotation ( const Model::EnableKeyRotationRequest request) const
virtual

Enables automatic rotation of the key material for the specified symmetric KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:EnableKeyRotation (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DisableKeyRotation

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ EnableKeyRotationAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EnableKeyRotationAsync ( const Model::EnableKeyRotationRequest request,
const EnableKeyRotationResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Enables automatic rotation of the key material for the specified symmetric KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:EnableKeyRotation (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DisableKeyRotation

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ EnableKeyRotationCallable()

virtual Model::EnableKeyRotationOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EnableKeyRotationCallable ( const Model::EnableKeyRotationRequest request) const
virtual

Enables automatic rotation of the key material for the specified symmetric KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:EnableKeyRotation (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DisableKeyRotation

  • GetKeyRotationStatus

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ Encrypt()

virtual Model::EncryptOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::Encrypt ( const Model::EncryptRequest request) const
virtual

Encrypts plaintext into ciphertext by using a KMS key. The Encrypt operation has two primary use cases:

  • You can encrypt small amounts of arbitrary data, such as a personal identifier or database password, or other sensitive information.

  • You can use the Encrypt operation to move encrypted data from one Amazon Web Services Region to another. For example, in Region A, generate a data key and use the plaintext key to encrypt your data. Then, in Region A, use the Encrypt operation to encrypt the plaintext data key under a KMS key in Region B. Now, you can move the encrypted data and the encrypted data key to Region B. When necessary, you can decrypt the encrypted data key and the encrypted data entirely within in Region B.

You don't need to use the Encrypt operation to encrypt a data key. The GenerateDataKey and GenerateDataKeyPair operations return a plaintext data key and an encrypted copy of that data key.

When you encrypt data, you must specify a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key to use in the encryption operation. The KMS key must have a KeyUsage value of ENCRYPT_DECRYPT. To find the KeyUsage of a KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

If you use a symmetric KMS key, you can use an encryption context to add additional security to your encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext when encrypting data, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the data. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

If you specify an asymmetric KMS key, you must also specify the encryption algorithm. The algorithm must be compatible with the KMS key type.

When you use an asymmetric KMS key to encrypt or reencrypt data, be sure to record the KMS key and encryption algorithm that you choose. You will be required to provide the same KMS key and encryption algorithm when you decrypt the data. If the KMS key and algorithm do not match the values used to encrypt the data, the decrypt operation fails.

You are not required to supply the key ID and encryption algorithm when you decrypt with symmetric KMS keys because KMS stores this information in the ciphertext blob. KMS cannot store metadata in ciphertext generated with asymmetric keys. The standard format for asymmetric key ciphertext does not include configurable fields.

The maximum size of the data that you can encrypt varies with the type of KMS key and the encryption algorithm that you choose.

  • Symmetric KMS keys

    • SYMMETRIC_DEFAULT: 4096 bytes

  • RSA_2048

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 214 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 190 bytes

  • RSA_3072

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 342 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 318 bytes

  • RSA_4096

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 470 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 446 bytes

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Encrypt (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ EncryptAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EncryptAsync ( const Model::EncryptRequest request,
const EncryptResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Encrypts plaintext into ciphertext by using a KMS key. The Encrypt operation has two primary use cases:

  • You can encrypt small amounts of arbitrary data, such as a personal identifier or database password, or other sensitive information.

  • You can use the Encrypt operation to move encrypted data from one Amazon Web Services Region to another. For example, in Region A, generate a data key and use the plaintext key to encrypt your data. Then, in Region A, use the Encrypt operation to encrypt the plaintext data key under a KMS key in Region B. Now, you can move the encrypted data and the encrypted data key to Region B. When necessary, you can decrypt the encrypted data key and the encrypted data entirely within in Region B.

You don't need to use the Encrypt operation to encrypt a data key. The GenerateDataKey and GenerateDataKeyPair operations return a plaintext data key and an encrypted copy of that data key.

When you encrypt data, you must specify a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key to use in the encryption operation. The KMS key must have a KeyUsage value of ENCRYPT_DECRYPT. To find the KeyUsage of a KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

If you use a symmetric KMS key, you can use an encryption context to add additional security to your encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext when encrypting data, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the data. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

If you specify an asymmetric KMS key, you must also specify the encryption algorithm. The algorithm must be compatible with the KMS key type.

When you use an asymmetric KMS key to encrypt or reencrypt data, be sure to record the KMS key and encryption algorithm that you choose. You will be required to provide the same KMS key and encryption algorithm when you decrypt the data. If the KMS key and algorithm do not match the values used to encrypt the data, the decrypt operation fails.

You are not required to supply the key ID and encryption algorithm when you decrypt with symmetric KMS keys because KMS stores this information in the ciphertext blob. KMS cannot store metadata in ciphertext generated with asymmetric keys. The standard format for asymmetric key ciphertext does not include configurable fields.

The maximum size of the data that you can encrypt varies with the type of KMS key and the encryption algorithm that you choose.

  • Symmetric KMS keys

    • SYMMETRIC_DEFAULT: 4096 bytes

  • RSA_2048

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 214 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 190 bytes

  • RSA_3072

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 342 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 318 bytes

  • RSA_4096

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 470 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 446 bytes

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Encrypt (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ EncryptCallable()

virtual Model::EncryptOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::EncryptCallable ( const Model::EncryptRequest request) const
virtual

Encrypts plaintext into ciphertext by using a KMS key. The Encrypt operation has two primary use cases:

  • You can encrypt small amounts of arbitrary data, such as a personal identifier or database password, or other sensitive information.

  • You can use the Encrypt operation to move encrypted data from one Amazon Web Services Region to another. For example, in Region A, generate a data key and use the plaintext key to encrypt your data. Then, in Region A, use the Encrypt operation to encrypt the plaintext data key under a KMS key in Region B. Now, you can move the encrypted data and the encrypted data key to Region B. When necessary, you can decrypt the encrypted data key and the encrypted data entirely within in Region B.

You don't need to use the Encrypt operation to encrypt a data key. The GenerateDataKey and GenerateDataKeyPair operations return a plaintext data key and an encrypted copy of that data key.

When you encrypt data, you must specify a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key to use in the encryption operation. The KMS key must have a KeyUsage value of ENCRYPT_DECRYPT. To find the KeyUsage of a KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

If you use a symmetric KMS key, you can use an encryption context to add additional security to your encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext when encrypting data, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the data. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

If you specify an asymmetric KMS key, you must also specify the encryption algorithm. The algorithm must be compatible with the KMS key type.

When you use an asymmetric KMS key to encrypt or reencrypt data, be sure to record the KMS key and encryption algorithm that you choose. You will be required to provide the same KMS key and encryption algorithm when you decrypt the data. If the KMS key and algorithm do not match the values used to encrypt the data, the decrypt operation fails.

You are not required to supply the key ID and encryption algorithm when you decrypt with symmetric KMS keys because KMS stores this information in the ciphertext blob. KMS cannot store metadata in ciphertext generated with asymmetric keys. The standard format for asymmetric key ciphertext does not include configurable fields.

The maximum size of the data that you can encrypt varies with the type of KMS key and the encryption algorithm that you choose.

  • Symmetric KMS keys

    • SYMMETRIC_DEFAULT: 4096 bytes

  • RSA_2048

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 214 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 190 bytes

  • RSA_3072

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 342 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 318 bytes

  • RSA_4096

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_1: 470 bytes

    • RSAES_OAEP_SHA_256: 446 bytes

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Encrypt (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GenerateDataKey()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKey ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique symmetric data key for client-side encryption. This operation returns a plaintext copy of the data key and a copy that is encrypted under a KMS key that you specify. You can use the plaintext key to encrypt your data outside of KMS and store the encrypted data key with the encrypted data.

GenerateDataKey returns a unique data key for each request. The bytes in the plaintext key are not related to the caller or the KMS key.

To generate a data key, specify the symmetric KMS key that will be used to encrypt the data key. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key to generate data keys. To get the type of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation. You must also specify the length of the data key. Use either the KeySpec or NumberOfBytes parameters (but not both). For 128-bit and 256-bit data keys, use the KeySpec parameter.

To get only an encrypted copy of the data key, use GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext. To generate an asymmetric data key pair, use the GenerateDataKeyPair or GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation. To get a cryptographically secure random byte string, use GenerateRandom.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

How to use your data key

We recommend that you use the following pattern to encrypt data locally in your application. You can write your own code or use a client-side encryption library, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK, the Amazon DynamoDB Encryption Client, or Amazon S3 client-side encryption to do these tasks for you.

To encrypt data outside of KMS:

  1. Use the GenerateDataKey operation to get a data key.

  2. Use the plaintext data key (in the Plaintext field of the response) to encrypt your data outside of KMS. Then erase the plaintext data key from memory.

  3. Store the encrypted data key (in the CiphertextBlob field of the response) with the encrypted data.

To decrypt data outside of KMS:

  1. Use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted data key. The operation returns a plaintext copy of the data key.

  2. Use the plaintext data key to decrypt data outside of KMS, then erase the plaintext data key from memory.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKey (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:


AWS API Reference

◆ GenerateDataKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyAsync ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyRequest request,
const GenerateDataKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Generates a unique symmetric data key for client-side encryption. This operation returns a plaintext copy of the data key and a copy that is encrypted under a KMS key that you specify. You can use the plaintext key to encrypt your data outside of KMS and store the encrypted data key with the encrypted data.

GenerateDataKey returns a unique data key for each request. The bytes in the plaintext key are not related to the caller or the KMS key.

To generate a data key, specify the symmetric KMS key that will be used to encrypt the data key. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key to generate data keys. To get the type of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation. You must also specify the length of the data key. Use either the KeySpec or NumberOfBytes parameters (but not both). For 128-bit and 256-bit data keys, use the KeySpec parameter.

To get only an encrypted copy of the data key, use GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext. To generate an asymmetric data key pair, use the GenerateDataKeyPair or GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation. To get a cryptographically secure random byte string, use GenerateRandom.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

How to use your data key

We recommend that you use the following pattern to encrypt data locally in your application. You can write your own code or use a client-side encryption library, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK, the Amazon DynamoDB Encryption Client, or Amazon S3 client-side encryption to do these tasks for you.

To encrypt data outside of KMS:

  1. Use the GenerateDataKey operation to get a data key.

  2. Use the plaintext data key (in the Plaintext field of the response) to encrypt your data outside of KMS. Then erase the plaintext data key from memory.

  3. Store the encrypted data key (in the CiphertextBlob field of the response) with the encrypted data.

To decrypt data outside of KMS:

  1. Use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted data key. The operation returns a plaintext copy of the data key.

  2. Use the plaintext data key to decrypt data outside of KMS, then erase the plaintext data key from memory.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKey (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:


AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GenerateDataKeyCallable()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyCallable ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique symmetric data key for client-side encryption. This operation returns a plaintext copy of the data key and a copy that is encrypted under a KMS key that you specify. You can use the plaintext key to encrypt your data outside of KMS and store the encrypted data key with the encrypted data.

GenerateDataKey returns a unique data key for each request. The bytes in the plaintext key are not related to the caller or the KMS key.

To generate a data key, specify the symmetric KMS key that will be used to encrypt the data key. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key to generate data keys. To get the type of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation. You must also specify the length of the data key. Use either the KeySpec or NumberOfBytes parameters (but not both). For 128-bit and 256-bit data keys, use the KeySpec parameter.

To get only an encrypted copy of the data key, use GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext. To generate an asymmetric data key pair, use the GenerateDataKeyPair or GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation. To get a cryptographically secure random byte string, use GenerateRandom.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

How to use your data key

We recommend that you use the following pattern to encrypt data locally in your application. You can write your own code or use a client-side encryption library, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK, the Amazon DynamoDB Encryption Client, or Amazon S3 client-side encryption to do these tasks for you.

To encrypt data outside of KMS:

  1. Use the GenerateDataKey operation to get a data key.

  2. Use the plaintext data key (in the Plaintext field of the response) to encrypt your data outside of KMS. Then erase the plaintext data key from memory.

  3. Store the encrypted data key (in the CiphertextBlob field of the response) with the encrypted data.

To decrypt data outside of KMS:

  1. Use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted data key. The operation returns a plaintext copy of the data key.

  2. Use the plaintext data key to decrypt data outside of KMS, then erase the plaintext data key from memory.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKey (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:


AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GenerateDataKeyPair()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyPair ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique asymmetric data key pair. The GenerateDataKeyPair operation returns a plaintext public key, a plaintext private key, and a copy of the private key that is encrypted under the symmetric KMS key you specify. You can use the data key pair to perform asymmetric cryptography and implement digital signatures outside of KMS.

You can use the public key that GenerateDataKeyPair returns to encrypt data or verify a signature outside of KMS. Then, store the encrypted private key with the data. When you are ready to decrypt data or sign a message, you can use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key.

To generate a data key pair, you must specify a symmetric KMS key to encrypt the private key in a data key pair. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key or a KMS key in a custom key store. To get the type and origin of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

Use the KeyPairSpec parameter to choose an RSA or Elliptic Curve (ECC) data key pair. KMS recommends that your use ECC key pairs for signing, and use RSA key pairs for either encryption or signing, but not both. However, KMS cannot enforce any restrictions on the use of data key pairs outside of KMS.

If you are using the data key pair to encrypt data, or for any operation where you don't immediately need a private key, consider using the GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation. GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns a plaintext public key and an encrypted private key, but omits the plaintext private key that you need only to decrypt ciphertext or sign a message. Later, when you need to decrypt the data or sign a message, use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key in the data key pair.

GenerateDataKeyPair returns a unique data key pair for each request. The bytes in the keys are not related to the caller or the KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key. The public key is a DER-encoded X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5280. The private key is a DER-encoded PKCS8 PrivateKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5958.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyPair (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:


AWS API Reference

◆ GenerateDataKeyPairAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyPairAsync ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairRequest request,
const GenerateDataKeyPairResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Generates a unique asymmetric data key pair. The GenerateDataKeyPair operation returns a plaintext public key, a plaintext private key, and a copy of the private key that is encrypted under the symmetric KMS key you specify. You can use the data key pair to perform asymmetric cryptography and implement digital signatures outside of KMS.

You can use the public key that GenerateDataKeyPair returns to encrypt data or verify a signature outside of KMS. Then, store the encrypted private key with the data. When you are ready to decrypt data or sign a message, you can use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key.

To generate a data key pair, you must specify a symmetric KMS key to encrypt the private key in a data key pair. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key or a KMS key in a custom key store. To get the type and origin of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

Use the KeyPairSpec parameter to choose an RSA or Elliptic Curve (ECC) data key pair. KMS recommends that your use ECC key pairs for signing, and use RSA key pairs for either encryption or signing, but not both. However, KMS cannot enforce any restrictions on the use of data key pairs outside of KMS.

If you are using the data key pair to encrypt data, or for any operation where you don't immediately need a private key, consider using the GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation. GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns a plaintext public key and an encrypted private key, but omits the plaintext private key that you need only to decrypt ciphertext or sign a message. Later, when you need to decrypt the data or sign a message, use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key in the data key pair.

GenerateDataKeyPair returns a unique data key pair for each request. The bytes in the keys are not related to the caller or the KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key. The public key is a DER-encoded X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5280. The private key is a DER-encoded PKCS8 PrivateKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5958.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyPair (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:


AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GenerateDataKeyPairCallable()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyPairCallable ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique asymmetric data key pair. The GenerateDataKeyPair operation returns a plaintext public key, a plaintext private key, and a copy of the private key that is encrypted under the symmetric KMS key you specify. You can use the data key pair to perform asymmetric cryptography and implement digital signatures outside of KMS.

You can use the public key that GenerateDataKeyPair returns to encrypt data or verify a signature outside of KMS. Then, store the encrypted private key with the data. When you are ready to decrypt data or sign a message, you can use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key.

To generate a data key pair, you must specify a symmetric KMS key to encrypt the private key in a data key pair. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key or a KMS key in a custom key store. To get the type and origin of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

Use the KeyPairSpec parameter to choose an RSA or Elliptic Curve (ECC) data key pair. KMS recommends that your use ECC key pairs for signing, and use RSA key pairs for either encryption or signing, but not both. However, KMS cannot enforce any restrictions on the use of data key pairs outside of KMS.

If you are using the data key pair to encrypt data, or for any operation where you don't immediately need a private key, consider using the GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation. GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns a plaintext public key and an encrypted private key, but omits the plaintext private key that you need only to decrypt ciphertext or sign a message. Later, when you need to decrypt the data or sign a message, use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key in the data key pair.

GenerateDataKeyPair returns a unique data key pair for each request. The bytes in the keys are not related to the caller or the KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key. The public key is a DER-encoded X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5280. The private key is a DER-encoded PKCS8 PrivateKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5958.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyPair (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:


AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique asymmetric data key pair. The GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation returns a plaintext public key and a copy of the private key that is encrypted under the symmetric KMS key you specify. Unlike GenerateDataKeyPair, this operation does not return a plaintext private key.

You can use the public key that GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns to encrypt data or verify a signature outside of KMS. Then, store the encrypted private key with the data. When you are ready to decrypt data or sign a message, you can use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key.

To generate a data key pair, you must specify a symmetric KMS key to encrypt the private key in a data key pair. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key or a KMS key in a custom key store. To get the type and origin of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

Use the KeyPairSpec parameter to choose an RSA or Elliptic Curve (ECC) data key pair. KMS recommends that your use ECC key pairs for signing, and use RSA key pairs for either encryption or signing, but not both. However, KMS cannot enforce any restrictions on the use of data key pairs outside of KMS.

GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns a unique data key pair for each request. The bytes in the key are not related to the caller or KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key. The public key is a DER-encoded X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5280.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextAsync ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextRequest request,
const GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Generates a unique asymmetric data key pair. The GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation returns a plaintext public key and a copy of the private key that is encrypted under the symmetric KMS key you specify. Unlike GenerateDataKeyPair, this operation does not return a plaintext private key.

You can use the public key that GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns to encrypt data or verify a signature outside of KMS. Then, store the encrypted private key with the data. When you are ready to decrypt data or sign a message, you can use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key.

To generate a data key pair, you must specify a symmetric KMS key to encrypt the private key in a data key pair. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key or a KMS key in a custom key store. To get the type and origin of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

Use the KeyPairSpec parameter to choose an RSA or Elliptic Curve (ECC) data key pair. KMS recommends that your use ECC key pairs for signing, and use RSA key pairs for either encryption or signing, but not both. However, KMS cannot enforce any restrictions on the use of data key pairs outside of KMS.

GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns a unique data key pair for each request. The bytes in the key are not related to the caller or KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key. The public key is a DER-encoded X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5280.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextCallable()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextCallable ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintextRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique asymmetric data key pair. The GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operation returns a plaintext public key and a copy of the private key that is encrypted under the symmetric KMS key you specify. Unlike GenerateDataKeyPair, this operation does not return a plaintext private key.

You can use the public key that GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns to encrypt data or verify a signature outside of KMS. Then, store the encrypted private key with the data. When you are ready to decrypt data or sign a message, you can use the Decrypt operation to decrypt the encrypted private key.

To generate a data key pair, you must specify a symmetric KMS key to encrypt the private key in a data key pair. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key or a KMS key in a custom key store. To get the type and origin of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

Use the KeyPairSpec parameter to choose an RSA or Elliptic Curve (ECC) data key pair. KMS recommends that your use ECC key pairs for signing, and use RSA key pairs for either encryption or signing, but not both. However, KMS cannot enforce any restrictions on the use of data key pairs outside of KMS.

GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext returns a unique data key pair for each request. The bytes in the key are not related to the caller or KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key. The public key is a DER-encoded X.509 SubjectPublicKeyInfo, as specified in RFC 5280.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique symmetric data key. This operation returns a data key that is encrypted under a KMS key that you specify. To request an asymmetric data key pair, use the GenerateDataKeyPair or GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operations.

GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext is identical to the GenerateDataKey operation except that returns only the encrypted copy of the data key. This operation is useful for systems that need to encrypt data at some point, but not immediately. When you need to encrypt the data, you call the Decrypt operation on the encrypted copy of the key.

It's also useful in distributed systems with different levels of trust. For example, you might store encrypted data in containers. One component of your system creates new containers and stores an encrypted data key with each container. Then, a different component puts the data into the containers. That component first decrypts the data key, uses the plaintext data key to encrypt data, puts the encrypted data into the container, and then destroys the plaintext data key. In this system, the component that creates the containers never sees the plaintext data key.

GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext returns a unique data key for each request. The bytes in the keys are not related to the caller or KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key.

To generate a data key, you must specify the symmetric KMS key that is used to encrypt the data key. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key to generate a data key. To get the type of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

If the operation succeeds, you will find the encrypted copy of the data key in the CiphertextBlob field.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextAsync ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextRequest request,
const GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Generates a unique symmetric data key. This operation returns a data key that is encrypted under a KMS key that you specify. To request an asymmetric data key pair, use the GenerateDataKeyPair or GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operations.

GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext is identical to the GenerateDataKey operation except that returns only the encrypted copy of the data key. This operation is useful for systems that need to encrypt data at some point, but not immediately. When you need to encrypt the data, you call the Decrypt operation on the encrypted copy of the key.

It's also useful in distributed systems with different levels of trust. For example, you might store encrypted data in containers. One component of your system creates new containers and stores an encrypted data key with each container. Then, a different component puts the data into the containers. That component first decrypts the data key, uses the plaintext data key to encrypt data, puts the encrypted data into the container, and then destroys the plaintext data key. In this system, the component that creates the containers never sees the plaintext data key.

GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext returns a unique data key for each request. The bytes in the keys are not related to the caller or KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key.

To generate a data key, you must specify the symmetric KMS key that is used to encrypt the data key. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key to generate a data key. To get the type of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

If the operation succeeds, you will find the encrypted copy of the data key in the CiphertextBlob field.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextCallable()

virtual Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextCallable ( const Model::GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintextRequest request) const
virtual

Generates a unique symmetric data key. This operation returns a data key that is encrypted under a KMS key that you specify. To request an asymmetric data key pair, use the GenerateDataKeyPair or GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext operations.

GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext is identical to the GenerateDataKey operation except that returns only the encrypted copy of the data key. This operation is useful for systems that need to encrypt data at some point, but not immediately. When you need to encrypt the data, you call the Decrypt operation on the encrypted copy of the key.

It's also useful in distributed systems with different levels of trust. For example, you might store encrypted data in containers. One component of your system creates new containers and stores an encrypted data key with each container. Then, a different component puts the data into the containers. That component first decrypts the data key, uses the plaintext data key to encrypt data, puts the encrypted data into the container, and then destroys the plaintext data key. In this system, the component that creates the containers never sees the plaintext data key.

GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext returns a unique data key for each request. The bytes in the keys are not related to the caller or KMS key that is used to encrypt the private key.

To generate a data key, you must specify the symmetric KMS key that is used to encrypt the data key. You cannot use an asymmetric KMS key to generate a data key. To get the type of your KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation.

If the operation succeeds, you will find the encrypted copy of the data key in the CiphertextBlob field.

You can use the optional encryption context to add additional security to the encryption operation. If you specify an EncryptionContext, you must specify the same encryption context (a case-sensitive exact match) when decrypting the encrypted data key. Otherwise, the request to decrypt fails with an InvalidCiphertextException. For more information, see Encryption Context in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateDataKeyWithoutPlaintext (key policy)

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

  • GenerateDataKeyPairWithoutPlaintext

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GenerateRandom()

virtual Model::GenerateRandomOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateRandom ( const Model::GenerateRandomRequest request) const
virtual

Returns a random byte string that is cryptographically secure.

By default, the random byte string is generated in KMS. To generate the byte string in the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with a custom key store, specify the custom key store ID.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For more information about entropy and random number generation, see Key Management Service Cryptographic Details.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateRandom (IAM policy)

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GenerateRandomAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateRandomAsync ( const Model::GenerateRandomRequest request,
const GenerateRandomResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Returns a random byte string that is cryptographically secure.

By default, the random byte string is generated in KMS. To generate the byte string in the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with a custom key store, specify the custom key store ID.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For more information about entropy and random number generation, see Key Management Service Cryptographic Details.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateRandom (IAM policy)

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GenerateRandomCallable()

virtual Model::GenerateRandomOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GenerateRandomCallable ( const Model::GenerateRandomRequest request) const
virtual

Returns a random byte string that is cryptographically secure.

By default, the random byte string is generated in KMS. To generate the byte string in the CloudHSM cluster that is associated with a custom key store, specify the custom key store ID.

Applications in Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves can call this operation by using the Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves Development Kit. For information about the supporting parameters, see How Amazon Web Services Nitro Enclaves use KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For more information about entropy and random number generation, see Key Management Service Cryptographic Details.

Required permissions: kms:GenerateRandom (IAM policy)

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GetKeyPolicy()

virtual Model::GetKeyPolicyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetKeyPolicy ( const Model::GetKeyPolicyRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a key policy attached to the specified KMS key.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:GetKeyPolicy (key policy)

Related operations: PutKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GetKeyPolicyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetKeyPolicyAsync ( const Model::GetKeyPolicyRequest request,
const GetKeyPolicyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets a key policy attached to the specified KMS key.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:GetKeyPolicy (key policy)

Related operations: PutKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GetKeyPolicyCallable()

virtual Model::GetKeyPolicyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetKeyPolicyCallable ( const Model::GetKeyPolicyRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a key policy attached to the specified KMS key.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:GetKeyPolicy (key policy)

Related operations: PutKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GetKeyRotationStatus()

virtual Model::GetKeyRotationStatusOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetKeyRotationStatus ( const Model::GetKeyRotationStatusRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a Boolean value that indicates whether automatic rotation of the key material is enabled for the specified KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key. The key rotation status for these KMS keys is always false.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

  • Disabled: The key rotation status does not change when you disable a KMS key. However, while the KMS key is disabled, KMS does not rotate the key material.

  • Pending deletion: While a KMS key is pending deletion, its key rotation status is false and KMS does not rotate the key material. If you cancel the deletion, the original key rotation status is restored.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GetKeyRotationStatus (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DisableKeyRotation

  • EnableKeyRotation

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GetKeyRotationStatusAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetKeyRotationStatusAsync ( const Model::GetKeyRotationStatusRequest request,
const GetKeyRotationStatusResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets a Boolean value that indicates whether automatic rotation of the key material is enabled for the specified KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key. The key rotation status for these KMS keys is always false.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

  • Disabled: The key rotation status does not change when you disable a KMS key. However, while the KMS key is disabled, KMS does not rotate the key material.

  • Pending deletion: While a KMS key is pending deletion, its key rotation status is false and KMS does not rotate the key material. If you cancel the deletion, the original key rotation status is restored.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GetKeyRotationStatus (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DisableKeyRotation

  • EnableKeyRotation

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GetKeyRotationStatusCallable()

virtual Model::GetKeyRotationStatusOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetKeyRotationStatusCallable ( const Model::GetKeyRotationStatusRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a Boolean value that indicates whether automatic rotation of the key material is enabled for the specified KMS key.

You cannot enable automatic rotation of asymmetric KMS keys, KMS keys with imported key material, or KMS keys in a custom key store. To enable or disable automatic rotation of a set of related multi-Region keys, set the property on the primary key. The key rotation status for these KMS keys is always false.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

  • Disabled: The key rotation status does not change when you disable a KMS key. However, while the KMS key is disabled, KMS does not rotate the key material.

  • Pending deletion: While a KMS key is pending deletion, its key rotation status is false and KMS does not rotate the key material. If you cancel the deletion, the original key rotation status is restored.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GetKeyRotationStatus (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DisableKeyRotation

  • EnableKeyRotation

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GetParametersForImport()

virtual Model::GetParametersForImportOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetParametersForImport ( const Model::GetParametersForImportRequest request) const
virtual

Returns the items you need to import key material into a symmetric, customer managed KMS key. For more information about importing key material into KMS, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation returns a public key and an import token. Use the public key to encrypt the symmetric key material. Store the import token to send with a subsequent ImportKeyMaterial request.

You must specify the key ID of the symmetric KMS key into which you will import key material. This KMS key's Origin must be EXTERNAL. You must also specify the wrapping algorithm and type of wrapping key (public key) that you will use to encrypt the key material. You cannot perform this operation on an asymmetric KMS key or on any KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

To import key material, you must use the public key and import token from the same response. These items are valid for 24 hours. The expiration date and time appear in the GetParametersForImport response. You cannot use an expired token in an ImportKeyMaterial request. If your key and token expire, send another GetParametersForImport request.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:GetParametersForImport (key policy)

Related operations:

  • ImportKeyMaterial

  • DeleteImportedKeyMaterial

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GetParametersForImportAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetParametersForImportAsync ( const Model::GetParametersForImportRequest request,
const GetParametersForImportResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Returns the items you need to import key material into a symmetric, customer managed KMS key. For more information about importing key material into KMS, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation returns a public key and an import token. Use the public key to encrypt the symmetric key material. Store the import token to send with a subsequent ImportKeyMaterial request.

You must specify the key ID of the symmetric KMS key into which you will import key material. This KMS key's Origin must be EXTERNAL. You must also specify the wrapping algorithm and type of wrapping key (public key) that you will use to encrypt the key material. You cannot perform this operation on an asymmetric KMS key or on any KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

To import key material, you must use the public key and import token from the same response. These items are valid for 24 hours. The expiration date and time appear in the GetParametersForImport response. You cannot use an expired token in an ImportKeyMaterial request. If your key and token expire, send another GetParametersForImport request.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:GetParametersForImport (key policy)

Related operations:

  • ImportKeyMaterial

  • DeleteImportedKeyMaterial

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GetParametersForImportCallable()

virtual Model::GetParametersForImportOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetParametersForImportCallable ( const Model::GetParametersForImportRequest request) const
virtual

Returns the items you need to import key material into a symmetric, customer managed KMS key. For more information about importing key material into KMS, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation returns a public key and an import token. Use the public key to encrypt the symmetric key material. Store the import token to send with a subsequent ImportKeyMaterial request.

You must specify the key ID of the symmetric KMS key into which you will import key material. This KMS key's Origin must be EXTERNAL. You must also specify the wrapping algorithm and type of wrapping key (public key) that you will use to encrypt the key material. You cannot perform this operation on an asymmetric KMS key or on any KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

To import key material, you must use the public key and import token from the same response. These items are valid for 24 hours. The expiration date and time appear in the GetParametersForImport response. You cannot use an expired token in an ImportKeyMaterial request. If your key and token expire, send another GetParametersForImport request.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:GetParametersForImport (key policy)

Related operations:

  • ImportKeyMaterial

  • DeleteImportedKeyMaterial

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ GetPublicKey()

virtual Model::GetPublicKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetPublicKey ( const Model::GetPublicKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Returns the public key of an asymmetric KMS key. Unlike the private key of a asymmetric KMS key, which never leaves KMS unencrypted, callers with kms:GetPublicKey permission can download the public key of an asymmetric KMS key. You can share the public key to allow others to encrypt messages and verify signatures outside of KMS. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You do not need to download the public key. Instead, you can use the public key within KMS by calling the Encrypt, ReEncrypt, or Verify operations with the identifier of an asymmetric KMS key. When you use the public key within KMS, you benefit from the authentication, authorization, and logging that are part of every KMS operation. You also reduce of risk of encrypting data that cannot be decrypted. These features are not effective outside of KMS. For details, see Special Considerations for Downloading Public Keys.

To help you use the public key safely outside of KMS, GetPublicKey returns important information about the public key in the response, including:

  • KeySpec: The type of key material in the public key, such as RSA_4096 or ECC_NIST_P521.

  • KeyUsage: Whether the key is used for encryption or signing.

  • EncryptionAlgorithms or SigningAlgorithms: A list of the encryption algorithms or the signing algorithms for the key.

Although KMS cannot enforce these restrictions on external operations, it is crucial that you use this information to prevent the public key from being used improperly. For example, you can prevent a public signing key from being used encrypt data, or prevent a public key from being used with an encryption algorithm that is not supported by KMS. You can also avoid errors, such as using the wrong signing algorithm in a verification operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GetPublicKey (key policy)

Related operations: CreateKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ GetPublicKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetPublicKeyAsync ( const Model::GetPublicKeyRequest request,
const GetPublicKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Returns the public key of an asymmetric KMS key. Unlike the private key of a asymmetric KMS key, which never leaves KMS unencrypted, callers with kms:GetPublicKey permission can download the public key of an asymmetric KMS key. You can share the public key to allow others to encrypt messages and verify signatures outside of KMS. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You do not need to download the public key. Instead, you can use the public key within KMS by calling the Encrypt, ReEncrypt, or Verify operations with the identifier of an asymmetric KMS key. When you use the public key within KMS, you benefit from the authentication, authorization, and logging that are part of every KMS operation. You also reduce of risk of encrypting data that cannot be decrypted. These features are not effective outside of KMS. For details, see Special Considerations for Downloading Public Keys.

To help you use the public key safely outside of KMS, GetPublicKey returns important information about the public key in the response, including:

  • KeySpec: The type of key material in the public key, such as RSA_4096 or ECC_NIST_P521.

  • KeyUsage: Whether the key is used for encryption or signing.

  • EncryptionAlgorithms or SigningAlgorithms: A list of the encryption algorithms or the signing algorithms for the key.

Although KMS cannot enforce these restrictions on external operations, it is crucial that you use this information to prevent the public key from being used improperly. For example, you can prevent a public signing key from being used encrypt data, or prevent a public key from being used with an encryption algorithm that is not supported by KMS. You can also avoid errors, such as using the wrong signing algorithm in a verification operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GetPublicKey (key policy)

Related operations: CreateKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ GetPublicKeyCallable()

virtual Model::GetPublicKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::GetPublicKeyCallable ( const Model::GetPublicKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Returns the public key of an asymmetric KMS key. Unlike the private key of a asymmetric KMS key, which never leaves KMS unencrypted, callers with kms:GetPublicKey permission can download the public key of an asymmetric KMS key. You can share the public key to allow others to encrypt messages and verify signatures outside of KMS. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

You do not need to download the public key. Instead, you can use the public key within KMS by calling the Encrypt, ReEncrypt, or Verify operations with the identifier of an asymmetric KMS key. When you use the public key within KMS, you benefit from the authentication, authorization, and logging that are part of every KMS operation. You also reduce of risk of encrypting data that cannot be decrypted. These features are not effective outside of KMS. For details, see Special Considerations for Downloading Public Keys.

To help you use the public key safely outside of KMS, GetPublicKey returns important information about the public key in the response, including:

  • KeySpec: The type of key material in the public key, such as RSA_4096 or ECC_NIST_P521.

  • KeyUsage: Whether the key is used for encryption or signing.

  • EncryptionAlgorithms or SigningAlgorithms: A list of the encryption algorithms or the signing algorithms for the key.

Although KMS cannot enforce these restrictions on external operations, it is crucial that you use this information to prevent the public key from being used improperly. For example, you can prevent a public signing key from being used encrypt data, or prevent a public key from being used with an encryption algorithm that is not supported by KMS. You can also avoid errors, such as using the wrong signing algorithm in a verification operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:GetPublicKey (key policy)

Related operations: CreateKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ImportKeyMaterial()

virtual Model::ImportKeyMaterialOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ImportKeyMaterial ( const Model::ImportKeyMaterialRequest request) const
virtual

Imports key material into an existing symmetric KMS KMS key that was created without key material. After you successfully import key material into a KMS key, you can reimport the same key material into that KMS key, but you cannot import different key material.

You cannot perform this operation on an asymmetric KMS key or on any KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account. For more information about creating KMS keys with no key material and then importing key material, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Before using this operation, call GetParametersForImport. Its response includes a public key and an import token. Use the public key to encrypt the key material. Then, submit the import token from the same GetParametersForImport response.

When calling this operation, you must specify the following values:

  • The key ID or key ARN of a KMS key with no key material. Its Origin must be EXTERNAL.

    To create a KMS key with no key material, call CreateKey and set the value of its Origin parameter to EXTERNAL. To get the Origin of a KMS key, call DescribeKey.)

  • The encrypted key material. To get the public key to encrypt the key material, call GetParametersForImport.

  • The import token that GetParametersForImport returned. You must use a public key and token from the same GetParametersForImport response.

  • Whether the key material expires and if so, when. If you set an expiration date, KMS deletes the key material from the KMS key on the specified date, and the KMS key becomes unusable. To use the KMS key again, you must reimport the same key material. The only way to change an expiration date is by reimporting the same key material and specifying a new expiration date.

When this operation is successful, the key state of the KMS key changes from PendingImport to Enabled, and you can use the KMS key.

If this operation fails, use the exception to help determine the problem. If the error is related to the key material, the import token, or wrapping key, use GetParametersForImport to get a new public key and import token for the KMS key and repeat the import procedure. For help, see How To Import Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ImportKeyMaterial (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DeleteImportedKeyMaterial

  • GetParametersForImport

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ImportKeyMaterialAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ImportKeyMaterialAsync ( const Model::ImportKeyMaterialRequest request,
const ImportKeyMaterialResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Imports key material into an existing symmetric KMS KMS key that was created without key material. After you successfully import key material into a KMS key, you can reimport the same key material into that KMS key, but you cannot import different key material.

You cannot perform this operation on an asymmetric KMS key or on any KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account. For more information about creating KMS keys with no key material and then importing key material, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Before using this operation, call GetParametersForImport. Its response includes a public key and an import token. Use the public key to encrypt the key material. Then, submit the import token from the same GetParametersForImport response.

When calling this operation, you must specify the following values:

  • The key ID or key ARN of a KMS key with no key material. Its Origin must be EXTERNAL.

    To create a KMS key with no key material, call CreateKey and set the value of its Origin parameter to EXTERNAL. To get the Origin of a KMS key, call DescribeKey.)

  • The encrypted key material. To get the public key to encrypt the key material, call GetParametersForImport.

  • The import token that GetParametersForImport returned. You must use a public key and token from the same GetParametersForImport response.

  • Whether the key material expires and if so, when. If you set an expiration date, KMS deletes the key material from the KMS key on the specified date, and the KMS key becomes unusable. To use the KMS key again, you must reimport the same key material. The only way to change an expiration date is by reimporting the same key material and specifying a new expiration date.

When this operation is successful, the key state of the KMS key changes from PendingImport to Enabled, and you can use the KMS key.

If this operation fails, use the exception to help determine the problem. If the error is related to the key material, the import token, or wrapping key, use GetParametersForImport to get a new public key and import token for the KMS key and repeat the import procedure. For help, see How To Import Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ImportKeyMaterial (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DeleteImportedKeyMaterial

  • GetParametersForImport

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ImportKeyMaterialCallable()

virtual Model::ImportKeyMaterialOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ImportKeyMaterialCallable ( const Model::ImportKeyMaterialRequest request) const
virtual

Imports key material into an existing symmetric KMS KMS key that was created without key material. After you successfully import key material into a KMS key, you can reimport the same key material into that KMS key, but you cannot import different key material.

You cannot perform this operation on an asymmetric KMS key or on any KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account. For more information about creating KMS keys with no key material and then importing key material, see Importing Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Before using this operation, call GetParametersForImport. Its response includes a public key and an import token. Use the public key to encrypt the key material. Then, submit the import token from the same GetParametersForImport response.

When calling this operation, you must specify the following values:

  • The key ID or key ARN of a KMS key with no key material. Its Origin must be EXTERNAL.

    To create a KMS key with no key material, call CreateKey and set the value of its Origin parameter to EXTERNAL. To get the Origin of a KMS key, call DescribeKey.)

  • The encrypted key material. To get the public key to encrypt the key material, call GetParametersForImport.

  • The import token that GetParametersForImport returned. You must use a public key and token from the same GetParametersForImport response.

  • Whether the key material expires and if so, when. If you set an expiration date, KMS deletes the key material from the KMS key on the specified date, and the KMS key becomes unusable. To use the KMS key again, you must reimport the same key material. The only way to change an expiration date is by reimporting the same key material and specifying a new expiration date.

When this operation is successful, the key state of the KMS key changes from PendingImport to Enabled, and you can use the KMS key.

If this operation fails, use the exception to help determine the problem. If the error is related to the key material, the import token, or wrapping key, use GetParametersForImport to get a new public key and import token for the KMS key and repeat the import procedure. For help, see How To Import Key Material in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ImportKeyMaterial (key policy)

Related operations:

  • DeleteImportedKeyMaterial

  • GetParametersForImport

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ListAliases()

virtual Model::ListAliasesOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListAliases ( const Model::ListAliasesRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a list of aliases in the caller's Amazon Web Services account and region. For more information about aliases, see CreateAlias.

By default, the ListAliases operation returns all aliases in the account and region. To get only the aliases associated with a particular KMS key, use the KeyId parameter.

The ListAliases response can include aliases that you created and associated with your customer managed keys, and aliases that Amazon Web Services created and associated with Amazon Web Services managed keys in your account. You can recognize Amazon Web Services aliases because their names have the format aws/<service-name>, such as aws/dynamodb.

The response might also include aliases that have no TargetKeyId field. These are predefined aliases that Amazon Web Services has created but has not yet associated with a KMS key. Aliases that Amazon Web Services creates in your account, including predefined aliases, do not count against your KMS aliases quota.

Cross-account use: No. ListAliases does not return aliases in other Amazon Web Services accounts.

Required permissions: kms:ListAliases (IAM policy)

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • DeleteAlias

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ListAliasesAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListAliasesAsync ( const Model::ListAliasesRequest request,
const ListAliasesResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets a list of aliases in the caller's Amazon Web Services account and region. For more information about aliases, see CreateAlias.

By default, the ListAliases operation returns all aliases in the account and region. To get only the aliases associated with a particular KMS key, use the KeyId parameter.

The ListAliases response can include aliases that you created and associated with your customer managed keys, and aliases that Amazon Web Services created and associated with Amazon Web Services managed keys in your account. You can recognize Amazon Web Services aliases because their names have the format aws/<service-name>, such as aws/dynamodb.

The response might also include aliases that have no TargetKeyId field. These are predefined aliases that Amazon Web Services has created but has not yet associated with a KMS key. Aliases that Amazon Web Services creates in your account, including predefined aliases, do not count against your KMS aliases quota.

Cross-account use: No. ListAliases does not return aliases in other Amazon Web Services accounts.

Required permissions: kms:ListAliases (IAM policy)

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • DeleteAlias

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ListAliasesCallable()

virtual Model::ListAliasesOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListAliasesCallable ( const Model::ListAliasesRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a list of aliases in the caller's Amazon Web Services account and region. For more information about aliases, see CreateAlias.

By default, the ListAliases operation returns all aliases in the account and region. To get only the aliases associated with a particular KMS key, use the KeyId parameter.

The ListAliases response can include aliases that you created and associated with your customer managed keys, and aliases that Amazon Web Services created and associated with Amazon Web Services managed keys in your account. You can recognize Amazon Web Services aliases because their names have the format aws/<service-name>, such as aws/dynamodb.

The response might also include aliases that have no TargetKeyId field. These are predefined aliases that Amazon Web Services has created but has not yet associated with a KMS key. Aliases that Amazon Web Services creates in your account, including predefined aliases, do not count against your KMS aliases quota.

Cross-account use: No. ListAliases does not return aliases in other Amazon Web Services accounts.

Required permissions: kms:ListAliases (IAM policy)

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • DeleteAlias

  • UpdateAlias

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ListGrants()

virtual Model::ListGrantsOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListGrants ( const Model::ListGrantsRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a list of all grants for the specified KMS key.

You must specify the KMS key in all requests. You can filter the grant list by grant ID or grantee principal.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

The GranteePrincipal field in the ListGrants response usually contains the user or role designated as the grantee principal in the grant. However, when the grantee principal in the grant is an Amazon Web Services service, the GranteePrincipal field contains the service principal, which might represent several different grantee principals.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:ListGrants (key policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ListGrantsAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListGrantsAsync ( const Model::ListGrantsRequest request,
const ListGrantsResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets a list of all grants for the specified KMS key.

You must specify the KMS key in all requests. You can filter the grant list by grant ID or grantee principal.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

The GranteePrincipal field in the ListGrants response usually contains the user or role designated as the grantee principal in the grant. However, when the grantee principal in the grant is an Amazon Web Services service, the GranteePrincipal field contains the service principal, which might represent several different grantee principals.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:ListGrants (key policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ListGrantsCallable()

virtual Model::ListGrantsOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListGrantsCallable ( const Model::ListGrantsRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a list of all grants for the specified KMS key.

You must specify the KMS key in all requests. You can filter the grant list by grant ID or grantee principal.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

The GranteePrincipal field in the ListGrants response usually contains the user or role designated as the grantee principal in the grant. However, when the grantee principal in the grant is an Amazon Web Services service, the GranteePrincipal field contains the service principal, which might represent several different grantee principals.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:ListGrants (key policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ListKeyPolicies()

virtual Model::ListKeyPoliciesOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListKeyPolicies ( const Model::ListKeyPoliciesRequest request) const
virtual

Gets the names of the key policies that are attached to a KMS key. This operation is designed to get policy names that you can use in a GetKeyPolicy operation. However, the only valid policy name is default.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListKeyPolicies (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetKeyPolicy

  • PutKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ListKeyPoliciesAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListKeyPoliciesAsync ( const Model::ListKeyPoliciesRequest request,
const ListKeyPoliciesResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets the names of the key policies that are attached to a KMS key. This operation is designed to get policy names that you can use in a GetKeyPolicy operation. However, the only valid policy name is default.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListKeyPolicies (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetKeyPolicy

  • PutKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ListKeyPoliciesCallable()

virtual Model::ListKeyPoliciesOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListKeyPoliciesCallable ( const Model::ListKeyPoliciesRequest request) const
virtual

Gets the names of the key policies that are attached to a KMS key. This operation is designed to get policy names that you can use in a GetKeyPolicy operation. However, the only valid policy name is default.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListKeyPolicies (key policy)

Related operations:

  • GetKeyPolicy

  • PutKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ListKeys()

virtual Model::ListKeysOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListKeys ( const Model::ListKeysRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a list of all KMS keys in the caller's Amazon Web Services account and Region.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListKeys (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateKey

  • DescribeKey

  • ListAliases

  • ListResourceTags

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ListKeysAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListKeysAsync ( const Model::ListKeysRequest request,
const ListKeysResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Gets a list of all KMS keys in the caller's Amazon Web Services account and Region.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListKeys (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateKey

  • DescribeKey

  • ListAliases

  • ListResourceTags

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ListKeysCallable()

virtual Model::ListKeysOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListKeysCallable ( const Model::ListKeysRequest request) const
virtual

Gets a list of all KMS keys in the caller's Amazon Web Services account and Region.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListKeys (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateKey

  • DescribeKey

  • ListAliases

  • ListResourceTags

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ListResourceTags()

virtual Model::ListResourceTagsOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListResourceTags ( const Model::ListResourceTagsRequest request) const
virtual

Returns all tags on the specified KMS key.

For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListResourceTags (key policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateKey

  • ReplicateKey

  • TagResource

  • UntagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ListResourceTagsAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListResourceTagsAsync ( const Model::ListResourceTagsRequest request,
const ListResourceTagsResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Returns all tags on the specified KMS key.

For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListResourceTags (key policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateKey

  • ReplicateKey

  • TagResource

  • UntagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ListResourceTagsCallable()

virtual Model::ListResourceTagsOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListResourceTagsCallable ( const Model::ListResourceTagsRequest request) const
virtual

Returns all tags on the specified KMS key.

For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference. For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ListResourceTags (key policy)

Related operations:

  • CreateKey

  • ReplicateKey

  • TagResource

  • UntagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ListRetirableGrants()

virtual Model::ListRetirableGrantsOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListRetirableGrants ( const Model::ListRetirableGrantsRequest request) const
virtual

Returns information about all grants in the Amazon Web Services account and Region that have the specified retiring principal.

You can specify any principal in your Amazon Web Services account. The grants that are returned include grants for KMS keys in your Amazon Web Services account and other Amazon Web Services accounts. You might use this operation to determine which grants you may retire. To retire a grant, use the RetireGrant operation.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: You must specify a principal in your Amazon Web Services account. However, this operation can return grants in any Amazon Web Services account. You do not need kms:ListRetirableGrants permission (or any other additional permission) in any Amazon Web Services account other than your own.

Required permissions: kms:ListRetirableGrants (IAM policy) in your Amazon Web Services account.

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ListRetirableGrantsAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListRetirableGrantsAsync ( const Model::ListRetirableGrantsRequest request,
const ListRetirableGrantsResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Returns information about all grants in the Amazon Web Services account and Region that have the specified retiring principal.

You can specify any principal in your Amazon Web Services account. The grants that are returned include grants for KMS keys in your Amazon Web Services account and other Amazon Web Services accounts. You might use this operation to determine which grants you may retire. To retire a grant, use the RetireGrant operation.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: You must specify a principal in your Amazon Web Services account. However, this operation can return grants in any Amazon Web Services account. You do not need kms:ListRetirableGrants permission (or any other additional permission) in any Amazon Web Services account other than your own.

Required permissions: kms:ListRetirableGrants (IAM policy) in your Amazon Web Services account.

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ListRetirableGrantsCallable()

virtual Model::ListRetirableGrantsOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ListRetirableGrantsCallable ( const Model::ListRetirableGrantsRequest request) const
virtual

Returns information about all grants in the Amazon Web Services account and Region that have the specified retiring principal.

You can specify any principal in your Amazon Web Services account. The grants that are returned include grants for KMS keys in your Amazon Web Services account and other Amazon Web Services accounts. You might use this operation to determine which grants you may retire. To retire a grant, use the RetireGrant operation.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: You must specify a principal in your Amazon Web Services account. However, this operation can return grants in any Amazon Web Services account. You do not need kms:ListRetirableGrants permission (or any other additional permission) in any Amazon Web Services account other than your own.

Required permissions: kms:ListRetirableGrants (IAM policy) in your Amazon Web Services account.

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • RetireGrant

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ OverrideEndpoint()

void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::OverrideEndpoint ( const Aws::String endpoint)

◆ PutKeyPolicy()

virtual Model::PutKeyPolicyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::PutKeyPolicy ( const Model::PutKeyPolicyRequest request) const
virtual

Attaches a key policy to the specified KMS key.

For more information about key policies, see Key Policies in the Key Management Service Developer Guide. For help writing and formatting a JSON policy document, see the IAM JSON Policy Reference in the Identity and Access Management User Guide . For examples of adding a key policy in multiple programming languages, see Setting a key policy in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:PutKeyPolicy (key policy)

Related operations: GetKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ PutKeyPolicyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::PutKeyPolicyAsync ( const Model::PutKeyPolicyRequest request,
const PutKeyPolicyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Attaches a key policy to the specified KMS key.

For more information about key policies, see Key Policies in the Key Management Service Developer Guide. For help writing and formatting a JSON policy document, see the IAM JSON Policy Reference in the Identity and Access Management User Guide . For examples of adding a key policy in multiple programming languages, see Setting a key policy in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:PutKeyPolicy (key policy)

Related operations: GetKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ PutKeyPolicyCallable()

virtual Model::PutKeyPolicyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::PutKeyPolicyCallable ( const Model::PutKeyPolicyRequest request) const
virtual

Attaches a key policy to the specified KMS key.

For more information about key policies, see Key Policies in the Key Management Service Developer Guide. For help writing and formatting a JSON policy document, see the IAM JSON Policy Reference in the Identity and Access Management User Guide . For examples of adding a key policy in multiple programming languages, see Setting a key policy in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:PutKeyPolicy (key policy)

Related operations: GetKeyPolicy

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ReEncrypt()

virtual Model::ReEncryptOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ReEncrypt ( const Model::ReEncryptRequest request) const
virtual

Decrypts ciphertext and then reencrypts it entirely within KMS. You can use this operation to change the KMS key under which data is encrypted, such as when you manually rotate a KMS key or change the KMS key that protects a ciphertext. You can also use it to reencrypt ciphertext under the same KMS key, such as to change the encryption context of a ciphertext.

The ReEncrypt operation can decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by using an KMS KMS key in an KMS operation, such as Encrypt or GenerateDataKey. It can also decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by using the public key of an asymmetric KMS key outside of KMS. However, it cannot decrypt ciphertext produced by other libraries, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK or Amazon S3 client-side encryption. These libraries return a ciphertext format that is incompatible with KMS.

When you use the ReEncrypt operation, you need to provide information for the decrypt operation and the subsequent encrypt operation.

  • If your ciphertext was encrypted under an asymmetric KMS key, you must use the SourceKeyId parameter to identify the KMS key that encrypted the ciphertext. You must also supply the encryption algorithm that was used. This information is required to decrypt the data.

  • If your ciphertext was encrypted under a symmetric KMS key, the SourceKeyId parameter is optional. KMS can get this information from metadata that it adds to the symmetric ciphertext blob. This feature adds durability to your implementation by ensuring that authorized users can decrypt ciphertext decades after it was encrypted, even if they've lost track of the key ID. However, specifying the source KMS key is always recommended as a best practice. When you use the SourceKeyId parameter to specify a KMS key, KMS uses only the KMS key you specify. If the ciphertext was encrypted under a different KMS key, the ReEncrypt operation fails. This practice ensures that you use the KMS key that you intend.

  • To reencrypt the data, you must use the DestinationKeyId parameter specify the KMS key that re-encrypts the data after it is decrypted. You can select a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key. If the destination KMS key is an asymmetric KMS key, you must also provide the encryption algorithm. The algorithm that you choose must be compatible with the KMS key.

    When you use an asymmetric KMS key to encrypt or reencrypt data, be sure to record the KMS key and encryption algorithm that you choose. You will be required to provide the same KMS key and encryption algorithm when you decrypt the data. If the KMS key and algorithm do not match the values used to encrypt the data, the decrypt operation fails.

    You are not required to supply the key ID and encryption algorithm when you decrypt with symmetric KMS keys because KMS stores this information in the ciphertext blob. KMS cannot store metadata in ciphertext generated with asymmetric keys. The standard format for asymmetric key ciphertext does not include configurable fields.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. The source KMS key and destination KMS key can be in different Amazon Web Services accounts. Either or both KMS keys can be in a different account than the caller. To specify a KMS key in a different account, you must use its key ARN or alias ARN.

Required permissions:

To permit reencryption from or to a KMS key, include the "kms:ReEncrypt*" permission in your key policy. This permission is automatically included in the key policy when you use the console to create a KMS key. But you must include it manually when you create a KMS key programmatically or when you use the PutKeyPolicy operation to set a key policy.

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ReEncryptAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ReEncryptAsync ( const Model::ReEncryptRequest request,
const ReEncryptResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Decrypts ciphertext and then reencrypts it entirely within KMS. You can use this operation to change the KMS key under which data is encrypted, such as when you manually rotate a KMS key or change the KMS key that protects a ciphertext. You can also use it to reencrypt ciphertext under the same KMS key, such as to change the encryption context of a ciphertext.

The ReEncrypt operation can decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by using an KMS KMS key in an KMS operation, such as Encrypt or GenerateDataKey. It can also decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by using the public key of an asymmetric KMS key outside of KMS. However, it cannot decrypt ciphertext produced by other libraries, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK or Amazon S3 client-side encryption. These libraries return a ciphertext format that is incompatible with KMS.

When you use the ReEncrypt operation, you need to provide information for the decrypt operation and the subsequent encrypt operation.

  • If your ciphertext was encrypted under an asymmetric KMS key, you must use the SourceKeyId parameter to identify the KMS key that encrypted the ciphertext. You must also supply the encryption algorithm that was used. This information is required to decrypt the data.

  • If your ciphertext was encrypted under a symmetric KMS key, the SourceKeyId parameter is optional. KMS can get this information from metadata that it adds to the symmetric ciphertext blob. This feature adds durability to your implementation by ensuring that authorized users can decrypt ciphertext decades after it was encrypted, even if they've lost track of the key ID. However, specifying the source KMS key is always recommended as a best practice. When you use the SourceKeyId parameter to specify a KMS key, KMS uses only the KMS key you specify. If the ciphertext was encrypted under a different KMS key, the ReEncrypt operation fails. This practice ensures that you use the KMS key that you intend.

  • To reencrypt the data, you must use the DestinationKeyId parameter specify the KMS key that re-encrypts the data after it is decrypted. You can select a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key. If the destination KMS key is an asymmetric KMS key, you must also provide the encryption algorithm. The algorithm that you choose must be compatible with the KMS key.

    When you use an asymmetric KMS key to encrypt or reencrypt data, be sure to record the KMS key and encryption algorithm that you choose. You will be required to provide the same KMS key and encryption algorithm when you decrypt the data. If the KMS key and algorithm do not match the values used to encrypt the data, the decrypt operation fails.

    You are not required to supply the key ID and encryption algorithm when you decrypt with symmetric KMS keys because KMS stores this information in the ciphertext blob. KMS cannot store metadata in ciphertext generated with asymmetric keys. The standard format for asymmetric key ciphertext does not include configurable fields.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. The source KMS key and destination KMS key can be in different Amazon Web Services accounts. Either or both KMS keys can be in a different account than the caller. To specify a KMS key in a different account, you must use its key ARN or alias ARN.

Required permissions:

To permit reencryption from or to a KMS key, include the "kms:ReEncrypt*" permission in your key policy. This permission is automatically included in the key policy when you use the console to create a KMS key. But you must include it manually when you create a KMS key programmatically or when you use the PutKeyPolicy operation to set a key policy.

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ReEncryptCallable()

virtual Model::ReEncryptOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ReEncryptCallable ( const Model::ReEncryptRequest request) const
virtual

Decrypts ciphertext and then reencrypts it entirely within KMS. You can use this operation to change the KMS key under which data is encrypted, such as when you manually rotate a KMS key or change the KMS key that protects a ciphertext. You can also use it to reencrypt ciphertext under the same KMS key, such as to change the encryption context of a ciphertext.

The ReEncrypt operation can decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by using an KMS KMS key in an KMS operation, such as Encrypt or GenerateDataKey. It can also decrypt ciphertext that was encrypted by using the public key of an asymmetric KMS key outside of KMS. However, it cannot decrypt ciphertext produced by other libraries, such as the Amazon Web Services Encryption SDK or Amazon S3 client-side encryption. These libraries return a ciphertext format that is incompatible with KMS.

When you use the ReEncrypt operation, you need to provide information for the decrypt operation and the subsequent encrypt operation.

  • If your ciphertext was encrypted under an asymmetric KMS key, you must use the SourceKeyId parameter to identify the KMS key that encrypted the ciphertext. You must also supply the encryption algorithm that was used. This information is required to decrypt the data.

  • If your ciphertext was encrypted under a symmetric KMS key, the SourceKeyId parameter is optional. KMS can get this information from metadata that it adds to the symmetric ciphertext blob. This feature adds durability to your implementation by ensuring that authorized users can decrypt ciphertext decades after it was encrypted, even if they've lost track of the key ID. However, specifying the source KMS key is always recommended as a best practice. When you use the SourceKeyId parameter to specify a KMS key, KMS uses only the KMS key you specify. If the ciphertext was encrypted under a different KMS key, the ReEncrypt operation fails. This practice ensures that you use the KMS key that you intend.

  • To reencrypt the data, you must use the DestinationKeyId parameter specify the KMS key that re-encrypts the data after it is decrypted. You can select a symmetric or asymmetric KMS key. If the destination KMS key is an asymmetric KMS key, you must also provide the encryption algorithm. The algorithm that you choose must be compatible with the KMS key.

    When you use an asymmetric KMS key to encrypt or reencrypt data, be sure to record the KMS key and encryption algorithm that you choose. You will be required to provide the same KMS key and encryption algorithm when you decrypt the data. If the KMS key and algorithm do not match the values used to encrypt the data, the decrypt operation fails.

    You are not required to supply the key ID and encryption algorithm when you decrypt with symmetric KMS keys because KMS stores this information in the ciphertext blob. KMS cannot store metadata in ciphertext generated with asymmetric keys. The standard format for asymmetric key ciphertext does not include configurable fields.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. The source KMS key and destination KMS key can be in different Amazon Web Services accounts. Either or both KMS keys can be in a different account than the caller. To specify a KMS key in a different account, you must use its key ARN or alias ARN.

Required permissions:

To permit reencryption from or to a KMS key, include the "kms:ReEncrypt*" permission in your key policy. This permission is automatically included in the key policy when you use the console to create a KMS key. But you must include it manually when you create a KMS key programmatically or when you use the PutKeyPolicy operation to set a key policy.

Related operations:

  • Decrypt

  • Encrypt

  • GenerateDataKey

  • GenerateDataKeyPair

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ReplicateKey()

virtual Model::ReplicateKeyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ReplicateKey ( const Model::ReplicateKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Replicates a multi-Region key into the specified Region. This operation creates a multi-Region replica key based on a multi-Region primary key in a different Region of the same Amazon Web Services partition. You can create multiple replicas of a primary key, but each must be in a different Region. To create a multi-Region primary key, use the CreateKey operation.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

A replica key is a fully-functional KMS key that can be used independently of its primary and peer replica keys. A primary key and its replica keys share properties that make them interoperable. They have the same key ID and key material. They also have the same key spec, key usage, key material origin, and automatic key rotation status. KMS automatically synchronizes these shared properties among related multi-Region keys. All other properties of a replica key can differ, including its key policy, tags, aliases, and key state. KMS pricing and quotas for KMS keys apply to each primary key and replica key.

When this operation completes, the new replica key has a transient key state of Creating. This key state changes to Enabled (or PendingImport) after a few seconds when the process of creating the new replica key is complete. While the key state is Creating, you can manage key, but you cannot yet use it in cryptographic operations. If you are creating and using the replica key programmatically, retry on KMSInvalidStateException or call DescribeKey to check its KeyState value before using it. For details about the Creating key state, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The CloudTrail log of a ReplicateKey operation records a ReplicateKey operation in the primary key's Region and a CreateKey operation in the replica key's Region.

If you replicate a multi-Region primary key with imported key material, the replica key is created with no key material. You must import the same key material that you imported into the primary key. For details, see Importing key material into multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To convert a replica key to a primary key, use the UpdatePrimaryRegion operation.

ReplicateKey uses different default values for the KeyPolicy and Tags parameters than those used in the KMS console. For details, see the parameter descriptions.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation to create a replica key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions:

  • kms:ReplicateKey on the primary key (in the primary key's Region). Include this permission in the primary key's key policy.

  • kms:CreateKey in an IAM policy in the replica Region.

  • To use the Tags parameter, kms:TagResource in an IAM policy in the replica Region.

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • UpdatePrimaryRegion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ReplicateKeyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ReplicateKeyAsync ( const Model::ReplicateKeyRequest request,
const ReplicateKeyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Replicates a multi-Region key into the specified Region. This operation creates a multi-Region replica key based on a multi-Region primary key in a different Region of the same Amazon Web Services partition. You can create multiple replicas of a primary key, but each must be in a different Region. To create a multi-Region primary key, use the CreateKey operation.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

A replica key is a fully-functional KMS key that can be used independently of its primary and peer replica keys. A primary key and its replica keys share properties that make them interoperable. They have the same key ID and key material. They also have the same key spec, key usage, key material origin, and automatic key rotation status. KMS automatically synchronizes these shared properties among related multi-Region keys. All other properties of a replica key can differ, including its key policy, tags, aliases, and key state. KMS pricing and quotas for KMS keys apply to each primary key and replica key.

When this operation completes, the new replica key has a transient key state of Creating. This key state changes to Enabled (or PendingImport) after a few seconds when the process of creating the new replica key is complete. While the key state is Creating, you can manage key, but you cannot yet use it in cryptographic operations. If you are creating and using the replica key programmatically, retry on KMSInvalidStateException or call DescribeKey to check its KeyState value before using it. For details about the Creating key state, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The CloudTrail log of a ReplicateKey operation records a ReplicateKey operation in the primary key's Region and a CreateKey operation in the replica key's Region.

If you replicate a multi-Region primary key with imported key material, the replica key is created with no key material. You must import the same key material that you imported into the primary key. For details, see Importing key material into multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To convert a replica key to a primary key, use the UpdatePrimaryRegion operation.

ReplicateKey uses different default values for the KeyPolicy and Tags parameters than those used in the KMS console. For details, see the parameter descriptions.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation to create a replica key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions:

  • kms:ReplicateKey on the primary key (in the primary key's Region). Include this permission in the primary key's key policy.

  • kms:CreateKey in an IAM policy in the replica Region.

  • To use the Tags parameter, kms:TagResource in an IAM policy in the replica Region.

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • UpdatePrimaryRegion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ReplicateKeyCallable()

virtual Model::ReplicateKeyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ReplicateKeyCallable ( const Model::ReplicateKeyRequest request) const
virtual

Replicates a multi-Region key into the specified Region. This operation creates a multi-Region replica key based on a multi-Region primary key in a different Region of the same Amazon Web Services partition. You can create multiple replicas of a primary key, but each must be in a different Region. To create a multi-Region primary key, use the CreateKey operation.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

A replica key is a fully-functional KMS key that can be used independently of its primary and peer replica keys. A primary key and its replica keys share properties that make them interoperable. They have the same key ID and key material. They also have the same key spec, key usage, key material origin, and automatic key rotation status. KMS automatically synchronizes these shared properties among related multi-Region keys. All other properties of a replica key can differ, including its key policy, tags, aliases, and key state. KMS pricing and quotas for KMS keys apply to each primary key and replica key.

When this operation completes, the new replica key has a transient key state of Creating. This key state changes to Enabled (or PendingImport) after a few seconds when the process of creating the new replica key is complete. While the key state is Creating, you can manage key, but you cannot yet use it in cryptographic operations. If you are creating and using the replica key programmatically, retry on KMSInvalidStateException or call DescribeKey to check its KeyState value before using it. For details about the Creating key state, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The CloudTrail log of a ReplicateKey operation records a ReplicateKey operation in the primary key's Region and a CreateKey operation in the replica key's Region.

If you replicate a multi-Region primary key with imported key material, the replica key is created with no key material. You must import the same key material that you imported into the primary key. For details, see Importing key material into multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To convert a replica key to a primary key, use the UpdatePrimaryRegion operation.

ReplicateKey uses different default values for the KeyPolicy and Tags parameters than those used in the KMS console. For details, see the parameter descriptions.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation to create a replica key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions:

  • kms:ReplicateKey on the primary key (in the primary key's Region). Include this permission in the primary key's key policy.

  • kms:CreateKey in an IAM policy in the replica Region.

  • To use the Tags parameter, kms:TagResource in an IAM policy in the replica Region.

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • UpdatePrimaryRegion

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ RetireGrant()

virtual Model::RetireGrantOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::RetireGrant ( const Model::RetireGrantRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes a grant. Typically, you retire a grant when you no longer need its permissions. To identify the grant to retire, use a grant token, or both the grant ID and a key identifier (key ID or key ARN) of the KMS key. The CreateGrant operation returns both values.

This operation can be called by the retiring principal for a grant, by the grantee principal if the grant allows the RetireGrant operation, and by the Amazon Web Services account (root user) in which the grant is created. It can also be called by principals to whom permission for retiring a grant is delegated. For details, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: Yes. You can retire a grant on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions::Permission to retire a grant is determined primarily by the grant. For details, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ RetireGrantAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::RetireGrantAsync ( const Model::RetireGrantRequest request,
const RetireGrantResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Deletes a grant. Typically, you retire a grant when you no longer need its permissions. To identify the grant to retire, use a grant token, or both the grant ID and a key identifier (key ID or key ARN) of the KMS key. The CreateGrant operation returns both values.

This operation can be called by the retiring principal for a grant, by the grantee principal if the grant allows the RetireGrant operation, and by the Amazon Web Services account (root user) in which the grant is created. It can also be called by principals to whom permission for retiring a grant is delegated. For details, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: Yes. You can retire a grant on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions::Permission to retire a grant is determined primarily by the grant. For details, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ RetireGrantCallable()

virtual Model::RetireGrantOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::RetireGrantCallable ( const Model::RetireGrantRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes a grant. Typically, you retire a grant when you no longer need its permissions. To identify the grant to retire, use a grant token, or both the grant ID and a key identifier (key ID or key ARN) of the KMS key. The CreateGrant operation returns both values.

This operation can be called by the retiring principal for a grant, by the grantee principal if the grant allows the RetireGrant operation, and by the Amazon Web Services account (root user) in which the grant is created. It can also be called by principals to whom permission for retiring a grant is delegated. For details, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: Yes. You can retire a grant on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions::Permission to retire a grant is determined primarily by the grant. For details, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RevokeGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ RevokeGrant()

virtual Model::RevokeGrantOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::RevokeGrant ( const Model::RevokeGrantRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes the specified grant. You revoke a grant to terminate the permissions that the grant allows. For more information, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

When you create, retire, or revoke a grant, there might be a brief delay, usually less than five minutes, until the grant is available throughout KMS. This state is known as eventual consistency. For details, see Eventual consistency in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:RevokeGrant (key policy).

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ RevokeGrantAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::RevokeGrantAsync ( const Model::RevokeGrantRequest request,
const RevokeGrantResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Deletes the specified grant. You revoke a grant to terminate the permissions that the grant allows. For more information, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

When you create, retire, or revoke a grant, there might be a brief delay, usually less than five minutes, until the grant is available throughout KMS. This state is known as eventual consistency. For details, see Eventual consistency in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:RevokeGrant (key policy).

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ RevokeGrantCallable()

virtual Model::RevokeGrantOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::RevokeGrantCallable ( const Model::RevokeGrantRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes the specified grant. You revoke a grant to terminate the permissions that the grant allows. For more information, see Retiring and revoking grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

When you create, retire, or revoke a grant, there might be a brief delay, usually less than five minutes, until the grant is available throughout KMS. This state is known as eventual consistency. For details, see Eventual consistency in the Key Management Service Developer Guide .

For detailed information about grants, including grant terminology, see Using grants in the Key Management Service Developer Guide . For examples of working with grants in several programming languages, see Programming grants.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:RevokeGrant (key policy).

Related operations:

  • CreateGrant

  • ListGrants

  • ListRetirableGrants

  • RetireGrant

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ ScheduleKeyDeletion()

virtual Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ScheduleKeyDeletion ( const Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionRequest request) const
virtual

Schedules the deletion of a KMS key. By default, KMS applies a waiting period of 30 days, but you can specify a waiting period of 7-30 days. When this operation is successful, the key state of the KMS key changes to PendingDeletion and the key can't be used in any cryptographic operations. It remains in this state for the duration of the waiting period. Before the waiting period ends, you can use CancelKeyDeletion to cancel the deletion of the KMS key. After the waiting period ends, KMS deletes the KMS key, its key material, and all KMS data associated with it, including all aliases that refer to it.

Deleting a KMS key is a destructive and potentially dangerous operation. When a KMS key is deleted, all data that was encrypted under the KMS key is unrecoverable. (The only exception is a multi-Region replica key.) To prevent the use of a KMS key without deleting it, use DisableKey.

If you schedule deletion of a KMS key from a custom key store, when the waiting period expires, ScheduleKeyDeletion deletes the KMS key from KMS. Then KMS makes a best effort to delete the key material from the associated CloudHSM cluster. However, you might need to manually delete the orphaned key material from the cluster and its backups.

You can schedule the deletion of a multi-Region primary key and its replica keys at any time. However, KMS will not delete a multi-Region primary key with existing replica keys. If you schedule the deletion of a primary key with replicas, its key state changes to PendingReplicaDeletion and it cannot be replicated or used in cryptographic operations. This status can continue indefinitely. When the last of its replicas keys is deleted (not just scheduled), the key state of the primary key changes to PendingDeletion and its waiting period (PendingWindowInDays) begins. For details, see Deleting multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For more information about scheduling a KMS key for deletion, see Deleting KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion (key policy)

Related operations

  • CancelKeyDeletion

  • DisableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ ScheduleKeyDeletionAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ScheduleKeyDeletionAsync ( const Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionRequest request,
const ScheduleKeyDeletionResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Schedules the deletion of a KMS key. By default, KMS applies a waiting period of 30 days, but you can specify a waiting period of 7-30 days. When this operation is successful, the key state of the KMS key changes to PendingDeletion and the key can't be used in any cryptographic operations. It remains in this state for the duration of the waiting period. Before the waiting period ends, you can use CancelKeyDeletion to cancel the deletion of the KMS key. After the waiting period ends, KMS deletes the KMS key, its key material, and all KMS data associated with it, including all aliases that refer to it.

Deleting a KMS key is a destructive and potentially dangerous operation. When a KMS key is deleted, all data that was encrypted under the KMS key is unrecoverable. (The only exception is a multi-Region replica key.) To prevent the use of a KMS key without deleting it, use DisableKey.

If you schedule deletion of a KMS key from a custom key store, when the waiting period expires, ScheduleKeyDeletion deletes the KMS key from KMS. Then KMS makes a best effort to delete the key material from the associated CloudHSM cluster. However, you might need to manually delete the orphaned key material from the cluster and its backups.

You can schedule the deletion of a multi-Region primary key and its replica keys at any time. However, KMS will not delete a multi-Region primary key with existing replica keys. If you schedule the deletion of a primary key with replicas, its key state changes to PendingReplicaDeletion and it cannot be replicated or used in cryptographic operations. This status can continue indefinitely. When the last of its replicas keys is deleted (not just scheduled), the key state of the primary key changes to PendingDeletion and its waiting period (PendingWindowInDays) begins. For details, see Deleting multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For more information about scheduling a KMS key for deletion, see Deleting KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion (key policy)

Related operations

  • CancelKeyDeletion

  • DisableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ ScheduleKeyDeletionCallable()

virtual Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::ScheduleKeyDeletionCallable ( const Model::ScheduleKeyDeletionRequest request) const
virtual

Schedules the deletion of a KMS key. By default, KMS applies a waiting period of 30 days, but you can specify a waiting period of 7-30 days. When this operation is successful, the key state of the KMS key changes to PendingDeletion and the key can't be used in any cryptographic operations. It remains in this state for the duration of the waiting period. Before the waiting period ends, you can use CancelKeyDeletion to cancel the deletion of the KMS key. After the waiting period ends, KMS deletes the KMS key, its key material, and all KMS data associated with it, including all aliases that refer to it.

Deleting a KMS key is a destructive and potentially dangerous operation. When a KMS key is deleted, all data that was encrypted under the KMS key is unrecoverable. (The only exception is a multi-Region replica key.) To prevent the use of a KMS key without deleting it, use DisableKey.

If you schedule deletion of a KMS key from a custom key store, when the waiting period expires, ScheduleKeyDeletion deletes the KMS key from KMS. Then KMS makes a best effort to delete the key material from the associated CloudHSM cluster. However, you might need to manually delete the orphaned key material from the cluster and its backups.

You can schedule the deletion of a multi-Region primary key and its replica keys at any time. However, KMS will not delete a multi-Region primary key with existing replica keys. If you schedule the deletion of a primary key with replicas, its key state changes to PendingReplicaDeletion and it cannot be replicated or used in cryptographic operations. This status can continue indefinitely. When the last of its replicas keys is deleted (not just scheduled), the key state of the primary key changes to PendingDeletion and its waiting period (PendingWindowInDays) begins. For details, see Deleting multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

For more information about scheduling a KMS key for deletion, see Deleting KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:ScheduleKeyDeletion (key policy)

Related operations

  • CancelKeyDeletion

  • DisableKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ Sign()

virtual Model::SignOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::Sign ( const Model::SignRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a digital signature for a message or message digest by using the private key in an asymmetric KMS key. To verify the signature, use the Verify operation, or use the public key in the same asymmetric KMS key outside of KMS. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Digital signatures are generated and verified by using asymmetric key pair, such as an RSA or ECC pair that is represented by an asymmetric KMS key. The key owner (or an authorized user) uses their private key to sign a message. Anyone with the public key can verify that the message was signed with that particular private key and that the message hasn't changed since it was signed.

To use the Sign operation, provide the following information:

  • Use the KeyId parameter to identify an asymmetric KMS key with a KeyUsage value of SIGN_VERIFY. To get the KeyUsage value of a KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation. The caller must have kms:Sign permission on the KMS key.

  • Use the Message parameter to specify the message or message digest to sign. You can submit messages of up to 4096 bytes. To sign a larger message, generate a hash digest of the message, and then provide the hash digest in the Message parameter. To indicate whether the message is a full message or a digest, use the MessageType parameter.

  • Choose a signing algorithm that is compatible with the KMS key.

When signing a message, be sure to record the KMS key and the signing algorithm. This information is required to verify the signature.

To verify the signature that this operation generates, use the Verify operation. Or use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key and then use the public key to verify the signature outside of KMS.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Sign (key policy)

Related operations: Verify

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ SignAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::SignAsync ( const Model::SignRequest request,
const SignResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Creates a digital signature for a message or message digest by using the private key in an asymmetric KMS key. To verify the signature, use the Verify operation, or use the public key in the same asymmetric KMS key outside of KMS. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Digital signatures are generated and verified by using asymmetric key pair, such as an RSA or ECC pair that is represented by an asymmetric KMS key. The key owner (or an authorized user) uses their private key to sign a message. Anyone with the public key can verify that the message was signed with that particular private key and that the message hasn't changed since it was signed.

To use the Sign operation, provide the following information:

  • Use the KeyId parameter to identify an asymmetric KMS key with a KeyUsage value of SIGN_VERIFY. To get the KeyUsage value of a KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation. The caller must have kms:Sign permission on the KMS key.

  • Use the Message parameter to specify the message or message digest to sign. You can submit messages of up to 4096 bytes. To sign a larger message, generate a hash digest of the message, and then provide the hash digest in the Message parameter. To indicate whether the message is a full message or a digest, use the MessageType parameter.

  • Choose a signing algorithm that is compatible with the KMS key.

When signing a message, be sure to record the KMS key and the signing algorithm. This information is required to verify the signature.

To verify the signature that this operation generates, use the Verify operation. Or use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key and then use the public key to verify the signature outside of KMS.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Sign (key policy)

Related operations: Verify

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ SignCallable()

virtual Model::SignOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::SignCallable ( const Model::SignRequest request) const
virtual

Creates a digital signature for a message or message digest by using the private key in an asymmetric KMS key. To verify the signature, use the Verify operation, or use the public key in the same asymmetric KMS key outside of KMS. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Digital signatures are generated and verified by using asymmetric key pair, such as an RSA or ECC pair that is represented by an asymmetric KMS key. The key owner (or an authorized user) uses their private key to sign a message. Anyone with the public key can verify that the message was signed with that particular private key and that the message hasn't changed since it was signed.

To use the Sign operation, provide the following information:

  • Use the KeyId parameter to identify an asymmetric KMS key with a KeyUsage value of SIGN_VERIFY. To get the KeyUsage value of a KMS key, use the DescribeKey operation. The caller must have kms:Sign permission on the KMS key.

  • Use the Message parameter to specify the message or message digest to sign. You can submit messages of up to 4096 bytes. To sign a larger message, generate a hash digest of the message, and then provide the hash digest in the Message parameter. To indicate whether the message is a full message or a digest, use the MessageType parameter.

  • Choose a signing algorithm that is compatible with the KMS key.

When signing a message, be sure to record the KMS key and the signing algorithm. This information is required to verify the signature.

To verify the signature that this operation generates, use the Verify operation. Or use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key and then use the public key to verify the signature outside of KMS.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Sign (key policy)

Related operations: Verify

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ TagResource()

virtual Model::TagResourceOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::TagResource ( const Model::TagResourceRequest request) const
virtual

Adds or edits tags on a customer managed key.

Tagging or untagging a KMS key can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Each tag consists of a tag key and a tag value, both of which are case-sensitive strings. The tag value can be an empty (null) string. To add a tag, specify a new tag key and a tag value. To edit a tag, specify an existing tag key and a new tag value.

You can use this operation to tag a customer managed key, but you cannot tag an Amazon Web Services managed key, an Amazon Web Services owned key, a custom key store, or an alias.

You can also add tags to a KMS key while creating it (CreateKey) or replicating it (ReplicateKey).

For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys. For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:TagResource (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ListResourceTags

  • ReplicateKey

  • UntagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ TagResourceAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::TagResourceAsync ( const Model::TagResourceRequest request,
const TagResourceResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Adds or edits tags on a customer managed key.

Tagging or untagging a KMS key can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Each tag consists of a tag key and a tag value, both of which are case-sensitive strings. The tag value can be an empty (null) string. To add a tag, specify a new tag key and a tag value. To edit a tag, specify an existing tag key and a new tag value.

You can use this operation to tag a customer managed key, but you cannot tag an Amazon Web Services managed key, an Amazon Web Services owned key, a custom key store, or an alias.

You can also add tags to a KMS key while creating it (CreateKey) or replicating it (ReplicateKey).

For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys. For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:TagResource (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ListResourceTags

  • ReplicateKey

  • UntagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ TagResourceCallable()

virtual Model::TagResourceOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::TagResourceCallable ( const Model::TagResourceRequest request) const
virtual

Adds or edits tags on a customer managed key.

Tagging or untagging a KMS key can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Each tag consists of a tag key and a tag value, both of which are case-sensitive strings. The tag value can be an empty (null) string. To add a tag, specify a new tag key and a tag value. To edit a tag, specify an existing tag key and a new tag value.

You can use this operation to tag a customer managed key, but you cannot tag an Amazon Web Services managed key, an Amazon Web Services owned key, a custom key store, or an alias.

You can also add tags to a KMS key while creating it (CreateKey) or replicating it (ReplicateKey).

For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys. For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:TagResource (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ListResourceTags

  • ReplicateKey

  • UntagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ UntagResource()

virtual Model::UntagResourceOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UntagResource ( const Model::UntagResourceRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes tags from a customer managed key. To delete a tag, specify the tag key and the KMS key.

Tagging or untagging a KMS key can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When it succeeds, the UntagResource operation doesn't return any output. Also, if the specified tag key isn't found on the KMS key, it doesn't throw an exception or return a response. To confirm that the operation worked, use the ListResourceTags operation.

For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys. For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UntagResource (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ListResourceTags

  • ReplicateKey

  • TagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ UntagResourceAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UntagResourceAsync ( const Model::UntagResourceRequest request,
const UntagResourceResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Deletes tags from a customer managed key. To delete a tag, specify the tag key and the KMS key.

Tagging or untagging a KMS key can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When it succeeds, the UntagResource operation doesn't return any output. Also, if the specified tag key isn't found on the KMS key, it doesn't throw an exception or return a response. To confirm that the operation worked, use the ListResourceTags operation.

For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys. For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UntagResource (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ListResourceTags

  • ReplicateKey

  • TagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ UntagResourceCallable()

virtual Model::UntagResourceOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UntagResourceCallable ( const Model::UntagResourceRequest request) const
virtual

Deletes tags from a customer managed key. To delete a tag, specify the tag key and the KMS key.

Tagging or untagging a KMS key can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

When it succeeds, the UntagResource operation doesn't return any output. Also, if the specified tag key isn't found on the KMS key, it doesn't throw an exception or return a response. To confirm that the operation worked, use the ListResourceTags operation.

For information about using tags in KMS, see Tagging keys. For general information about tags, including the format and syntax, see Tagging Amazon Web Services resources in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UntagResource (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ListResourceTags

  • ReplicateKey

  • TagResource

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ UpdateAlias()

virtual Model::UpdateAliasOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateAlias ( const Model::UpdateAliasRequest request) const
virtual

Associates an existing KMS alias with a different KMS key. Each alias is associated with only one KMS key at a time, although a KMS key can have multiple aliases. The alias and the KMS key must be in the same Amazon Web Services account and Region.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The current and new KMS key must be the same type (both symmetric or both asymmetric), and they must have the same key usage (ENCRYPT_DECRYPT or SIGN_VERIFY). This restriction prevents errors in code that uses aliases. If you must assign an alias to a different type of KMS key, use DeleteAlias to delete the old alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias.

You cannot use UpdateAlias to change an alias name. To change an alias name, use DeleteAlias to delete the old alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias.

Because an alias is not a property of a KMS key, you can create, update, and delete the aliases of a KMS key without affecting the KMS key. Also, aliases do not appear in the response from the DescribeKey operation. To get the aliases of all KMS keys in the account, use the ListAliases operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • DeleteAlias

  • ListAliases

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ UpdateAliasAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateAliasAsync ( const Model::UpdateAliasRequest request,
const UpdateAliasResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Associates an existing KMS alias with a different KMS key. Each alias is associated with only one KMS key at a time, although a KMS key can have multiple aliases. The alias and the KMS key must be in the same Amazon Web Services account and Region.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The current and new KMS key must be the same type (both symmetric or both asymmetric), and they must have the same key usage (ENCRYPT_DECRYPT or SIGN_VERIFY). This restriction prevents errors in code that uses aliases. If you must assign an alias to a different type of KMS key, use DeleteAlias to delete the old alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias.

You cannot use UpdateAlias to change an alias name. To change an alias name, use DeleteAlias to delete the old alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias.

Because an alias is not a property of a KMS key, you can create, update, and delete the aliases of a KMS key without affecting the KMS key. Also, aliases do not appear in the response from the DescribeKey operation. To get the aliases of all KMS keys in the account, use the ListAliases operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • DeleteAlias

  • ListAliases

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ UpdateAliasCallable()

virtual Model::UpdateAliasOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateAliasCallable ( const Model::UpdateAliasRequest request) const
virtual

Associates an existing KMS alias with a different KMS key. Each alias is associated with only one KMS key at a time, although a KMS key can have multiple aliases. The alias and the KMS key must be in the same Amazon Web Services account and Region.

Adding, deleting, or updating an alias can allow or deny permission to the KMS key. For details, see Using ABAC in KMS in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The current and new KMS key must be the same type (both symmetric or both asymmetric), and they must have the same key usage (ENCRYPT_DECRYPT or SIGN_VERIFY). This restriction prevents errors in code that uses aliases. If you must assign an alias to a different type of KMS key, use DeleteAlias to delete the old alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias.

You cannot use UpdateAlias to change an alias name. To change an alias name, use DeleteAlias to delete the old alias and CreateAlias to create a new alias.

Because an alias is not a property of a KMS key, you can create, update, and delete the aliases of a KMS key without affecting the KMS key. Also, aliases do not appear in the response from the DescribeKey operation. To get the aliases of all KMS keys in the account, use the ListAliases operation.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions

For details, see Controlling access to aliases in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Related operations:

  • CreateAlias

  • DeleteAlias

  • ListAliases

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ UpdateCustomKeyStore()

virtual Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateCustomKeyStore ( const Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Changes the properties of a custom key store. Use the CustomKeyStoreId parameter to identify the custom key store you want to edit. Use the remaining parameters to change the properties of the custom key store.

You can only update a custom key store that is disconnected. To disconnect the custom key store, use DisconnectCustomKeyStore. To reconnect the custom key store after the update completes, use ConnectCustomKeyStore. To find the connection state of a custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation.

The CustomKeyStoreId parameter is required in all commands. Use the other parameters of UpdateCustomKeyStore to edit your key store settings.

  • Use the NewCustomKeyStoreName parameter to change the friendly name of the custom key store to the value that you specify.

  • Use the KeyStorePassword parameter tell KMS the current password of the kmsuser crypto user (CU) in the associated CloudHSM cluster. You can use this parameter to fix connection failures that occur when KMS cannot log into the associated cluster because the kmsuser password has changed. This value does not change the password in the CloudHSM cluster.

  • Use the CloudHsmClusterId parameter to associate the custom key store with a different, but related, CloudHSM cluster. You can use this parameter to repair a custom key store if its CloudHSM cluster becomes corrupted or is deleted, or when you need to create or restore a cluster from a backup.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UpdateCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ UpdateCustomKeyStoreAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateCustomKeyStoreAsync ( const Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreRequest request,
const UpdateCustomKeyStoreResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Changes the properties of a custom key store. Use the CustomKeyStoreId parameter to identify the custom key store you want to edit. Use the remaining parameters to change the properties of the custom key store.

You can only update a custom key store that is disconnected. To disconnect the custom key store, use DisconnectCustomKeyStore. To reconnect the custom key store after the update completes, use ConnectCustomKeyStore. To find the connection state of a custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation.

The CustomKeyStoreId parameter is required in all commands. Use the other parameters of UpdateCustomKeyStore to edit your key store settings.

  • Use the NewCustomKeyStoreName parameter to change the friendly name of the custom key store to the value that you specify.

  • Use the KeyStorePassword parameter tell KMS the current password of the kmsuser crypto user (CU) in the associated CloudHSM cluster. You can use this parameter to fix connection failures that occur when KMS cannot log into the associated cluster because the kmsuser password has changed. This value does not change the password in the CloudHSM cluster.

  • Use the CloudHsmClusterId parameter to associate the custom key store with a different, but related, CloudHSM cluster. You can use this parameter to repair a custom key store if its CloudHSM cluster becomes corrupted or is deleted, or when you need to create or restore a cluster from a backup.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UpdateCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ UpdateCustomKeyStoreCallable()

virtual Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateCustomKeyStoreCallable ( const Model::UpdateCustomKeyStoreRequest request) const
virtual

Changes the properties of a custom key store. Use the CustomKeyStoreId parameter to identify the custom key store you want to edit. Use the remaining parameters to change the properties of the custom key store.

You can only update a custom key store that is disconnected. To disconnect the custom key store, use DisconnectCustomKeyStore. To reconnect the custom key store after the update completes, use ConnectCustomKeyStore. To find the connection state of a custom key store, use the DescribeCustomKeyStores operation.

The CustomKeyStoreId parameter is required in all commands. Use the other parameters of UpdateCustomKeyStore to edit your key store settings.

  • Use the NewCustomKeyStoreName parameter to change the friendly name of the custom key store to the value that you specify.

  • Use the KeyStorePassword parameter tell KMS the current password of the kmsuser crypto user (CU) in the associated CloudHSM cluster. You can use this parameter to fix connection failures that occur when KMS cannot log into the associated cluster because the kmsuser password has changed. This value does not change the password in the CloudHSM cluster.

  • Use the CloudHsmClusterId parameter to associate the custom key store with a different, but related, CloudHSM cluster. You can use this parameter to repair a custom key store if its CloudHSM cluster becomes corrupted or is deleted, or when you need to create or restore a cluster from a backup.

If the operation succeeds, it returns a JSON object with no properties.

This operation is part of the Custom Key Store feature feature in KMS, which combines the convenience and extensive integration of KMS with the isolation and control of a single-tenant key store.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a custom key store in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UpdateCustomKeyStore (IAM policy)

Related operations:

  • ConnectCustomKeyStore

  • CreateCustomKeyStore

  • DeleteCustomKeyStore

  • DescribeCustomKeyStores

  • DisconnectCustomKeyStore

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ UpdateKeyDescription()

virtual Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateKeyDescription ( const Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionRequest request) const
virtual

Updates the description of a KMS key. To see the description of a KMS key, use DescribeKey.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UpdateKeyDescription (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • DescribeKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ UpdateKeyDescriptionAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateKeyDescriptionAsync ( const Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionRequest request,
const UpdateKeyDescriptionResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Updates the description of a KMS key. To see the description of a KMS key, use DescribeKey.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UpdateKeyDescription (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • DescribeKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ UpdateKeyDescriptionCallable()

virtual Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdateKeyDescriptionCallable ( const Model::UpdateKeyDescriptionRequest request) const
virtual

Updates the description of a KMS key. To see the description of a KMS key, use DescribeKey.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot perform this operation on a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions: kms:UpdateKeyDescription (key policy)

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • DescribeKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ UpdatePrimaryRegion()

virtual Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdatePrimaryRegion ( const Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionRequest request) const
virtual

Changes the primary key of a multi-Region key.

This operation changes the replica key in the specified Region to a primary key and changes the former primary key to a replica key. For example, suppose you have a primary key in us-east-1 and a replica key in eu-west-2. If you run UpdatePrimaryRegion with a PrimaryRegion value of eu-west-2, the primary key is now the key in eu-west-2, and the key in us-east-1 becomes a replica key. For details, see Updating the primary Region in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The primary key of a multi-Region key is the source for properties that are always shared by primary and replica keys, including the key material, key ID, key spec, key usage, key material origin, and automatic key rotation. It's the only key that can be replicated. You cannot delete the primary key until all replica keys are deleted.

The key ID and primary Region that you specify uniquely identify the replica key that will become the primary key. The primary Region must already have a replica key. This operation does not create a KMS key in the specified Region. To find the replica keys, use the DescribeKey operation on the primary key or any replica key. To create a replica key, use the ReplicateKey operation.

You can run this operation while using the affected multi-Region keys in cryptographic operations. This operation should not delay, interrupt, or cause failures in cryptographic operations.

Even after this operation completes, the process of updating the primary Region might still be in progress for a few more seconds. Operations such as DescribeKey might display both the old and new primary keys as replicas. The old and new primary keys have a transient key state of Updating. The original key state is restored when the update is complete. While the key state is Updating, you can use the keys in cryptographic operations, but you cannot replicate the new primary key or perform certain management operations, such as enabling or disabling these keys. For details about the Updating key state, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation does not return any output. To verify that primary key is changed, use the DescribeKey operation.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions:

  • kms:UpdatePrimaryRegion on the current primary key (in the primary key's Region). Include this permission primary key's key policy.

  • kms:UpdatePrimaryRegion on the current replica key (in the replica key's Region). Include this permission in the replica key's key policy.

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ReplicateKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ UpdatePrimaryRegionAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdatePrimaryRegionAsync ( const Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionRequest request,
const UpdatePrimaryRegionResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Changes the primary key of a multi-Region key.

This operation changes the replica key in the specified Region to a primary key and changes the former primary key to a replica key. For example, suppose you have a primary key in us-east-1 and a replica key in eu-west-2. If you run UpdatePrimaryRegion with a PrimaryRegion value of eu-west-2, the primary key is now the key in eu-west-2, and the key in us-east-1 becomes a replica key. For details, see Updating the primary Region in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The primary key of a multi-Region key is the source for properties that are always shared by primary and replica keys, including the key material, key ID, key spec, key usage, key material origin, and automatic key rotation. It's the only key that can be replicated. You cannot delete the primary key until all replica keys are deleted.

The key ID and primary Region that you specify uniquely identify the replica key that will become the primary key. The primary Region must already have a replica key. This operation does not create a KMS key in the specified Region. To find the replica keys, use the DescribeKey operation on the primary key or any replica key. To create a replica key, use the ReplicateKey operation.

You can run this operation while using the affected multi-Region keys in cryptographic operations. This operation should not delay, interrupt, or cause failures in cryptographic operations.

Even after this operation completes, the process of updating the primary Region might still be in progress for a few more seconds. Operations such as DescribeKey might display both the old and new primary keys as replicas. The old and new primary keys have a transient key state of Updating. The original key state is restored when the update is complete. While the key state is Updating, you can use the keys in cryptographic operations, but you cannot replicate the new primary key or perform certain management operations, such as enabling or disabling these keys. For details about the Updating key state, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation does not return any output. To verify that primary key is changed, use the DescribeKey operation.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions:

  • kms:UpdatePrimaryRegion on the current primary key (in the primary key's Region). Include this permission primary key's key policy.

  • kms:UpdatePrimaryRegion on the current replica key (in the replica key's Region). Include this permission in the replica key's key policy.

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ReplicateKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ UpdatePrimaryRegionCallable()

virtual Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::UpdatePrimaryRegionCallable ( const Model::UpdatePrimaryRegionRequest request) const
virtual

Changes the primary key of a multi-Region key.

This operation changes the replica key in the specified Region to a primary key and changes the former primary key to a replica key. For example, suppose you have a primary key in us-east-1 and a replica key in eu-west-2. If you run UpdatePrimaryRegion with a PrimaryRegion value of eu-west-2, the primary key is now the key in eu-west-2, and the key in us-east-1 becomes a replica key. For details, see Updating the primary Region in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation supports multi-Region keys, an KMS feature that lets you create multiple interoperable KMS keys in different Amazon Web Services Regions. Because these KMS keys have the same key ID, key material, and other metadata, you can use them interchangeably to encrypt data in one Amazon Web Services Region and decrypt it in a different Amazon Web Services Region without re-encrypting the data or making a cross-Region call. For more information about multi-Region keys, see Using multi-Region keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

The primary key of a multi-Region key is the source for properties that are always shared by primary and replica keys, including the key material, key ID, key spec, key usage, key material origin, and automatic key rotation. It's the only key that can be replicated. You cannot delete the primary key until all replica keys are deleted.

The key ID and primary Region that you specify uniquely identify the replica key that will become the primary key. The primary Region must already have a replica key. This operation does not create a KMS key in the specified Region. To find the replica keys, use the DescribeKey operation on the primary key or any replica key. To create a replica key, use the ReplicateKey operation.

You can run this operation while using the affected multi-Region keys in cryptographic operations. This operation should not delay, interrupt, or cause failures in cryptographic operations.

Even after this operation completes, the process of updating the primary Region might still be in progress for a few more seconds. Operations such as DescribeKey might display both the old and new primary keys as replicas. The old and new primary keys have a transient key state of Updating. The original key state is restored when the update is complete. While the key state is Updating, you can use the keys in cryptographic operations, but you cannot replicate the new primary key or perform certain management operations, such as enabling or disabling these keys. For details about the Updating key state, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

This operation does not return any output. To verify that primary key is changed, use the DescribeKey operation.

Cross-account use: No. You cannot use this operation in a different Amazon Web Services account.

Required permissions:

  • kms:UpdatePrimaryRegion on the current primary key (in the primary key's Region). Include this permission primary key's key policy.

  • kms:UpdatePrimaryRegion on the current replica key (in the replica key's Region). Include this permission in the replica key's key policy.

Related operations

  • CreateKey

  • ReplicateKey

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.

◆ Verify()

virtual Model::VerifyOutcome Aws::KMS::KMSClient::Verify ( const Model::VerifyRequest request) const
virtual

Verifies a digital signature that was generated by the Sign operation.

Verification confirms that an authorized user signed the message with the specified KMS key and signing algorithm, and the message hasn't changed since it was signed. If the signature is verified, the value of the SignatureValid field in the response is True. If the signature verification fails, the Verify operation fails with an KMSInvalidSignatureException exception.

A digital signature is generated by using the private key in an asymmetric KMS key. The signature is verified by using the public key in the same asymmetric KMS key. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To verify a digital signature, you can use the Verify operation. Specify the same asymmetric KMS key, message, and signing algorithm that were used to produce the signature.

You can also verify the digital signature by using the public key of the KMS key outside of KMS. Use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key in the asymmetric KMS key and then use the public key to verify the signature outside of KMS. The advantage of using the Verify operation is that it is performed within KMS. As a result, it's easy to call, the operation is performed within the FIPS boundary, it is logged in CloudTrail, and you can use key policy and IAM policy to determine who is authorized to use the KMS key to verify signatures.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Verify (key policy)

Related operations: Sign

See Also:

AWS API Reference

◆ VerifyAsync()

virtual void Aws::KMS::KMSClient::VerifyAsync ( const Model::VerifyRequest request,
const VerifyResponseReceivedHandler handler,
const std::shared_ptr< const Aws::Client::AsyncCallerContext > &  context = nullptr 
) const
virtual

Verifies a digital signature that was generated by the Sign operation.

Verification confirms that an authorized user signed the message with the specified KMS key and signing algorithm, and the message hasn't changed since it was signed. If the signature is verified, the value of the SignatureValid field in the response is True. If the signature verification fails, the Verify operation fails with an KMSInvalidSignatureException exception.

A digital signature is generated by using the private key in an asymmetric KMS key. The signature is verified by using the public key in the same asymmetric KMS key. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To verify a digital signature, you can use the Verify operation. Specify the same asymmetric KMS key, message, and signing algorithm that were used to produce the signature.

You can also verify the digital signature by using the public key of the KMS key outside of KMS. Use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key in the asymmetric KMS key and then use the public key to verify the signature outside of KMS. The advantage of using the Verify operation is that it is performed within KMS. As a result, it's easy to call, the operation is performed within the FIPS boundary, it is logged in CloudTrail, and you can use key policy and IAM policy to determine who is authorized to use the KMS key to verify signatures.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Verify (key policy)

Related operations: Sign

See Also:

AWS API Reference

Queues the request into a thread executor and triggers associated callback when operation has finished.

◆ VerifyCallable()

virtual Model::VerifyOutcomeCallable Aws::KMS::KMSClient::VerifyCallable ( const Model::VerifyRequest request) const
virtual

Verifies a digital signature that was generated by the Sign operation.

Verification confirms that an authorized user signed the message with the specified KMS key and signing algorithm, and the message hasn't changed since it was signed. If the signature is verified, the value of the SignatureValid field in the response is True. If the signature verification fails, the Verify operation fails with an KMSInvalidSignatureException exception.

A digital signature is generated by using the private key in an asymmetric KMS key. The signature is verified by using the public key in the same asymmetric KMS key. For information about symmetric and asymmetric KMS keys, see Using Symmetric and Asymmetric KMS keys in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

To verify a digital signature, you can use the Verify operation. Specify the same asymmetric KMS key, message, and signing algorithm that were used to produce the signature.

You can also verify the digital signature by using the public key of the KMS key outside of KMS. Use the GetPublicKey operation to download the public key in the asymmetric KMS key and then use the public key to verify the signature outside of KMS. The advantage of using the Verify operation is that it is performed within KMS. As a result, it's easy to call, the operation is performed within the FIPS boundary, it is logged in CloudTrail, and you can use key policy and IAM policy to determine who is authorized to use the KMS key to verify signatures.

The KMS key that you use for this operation must be in a compatible key state. For details, see Key state: Effect on your KMS key in the Key Management Service Developer Guide.

Cross-account use: Yes. To perform this operation with a KMS key in a different Amazon Web Services account, specify the key ARN or alias ARN in the value of the KeyId parameter.

Required permissions: kms:Verify (key policy)

Related operations: Sign

See Also:

AWS API Reference

returns a future to the operation so that it can be executed in parallel to other requests.


The documentation for this class was generated from the following file: